18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet paleo primal vegetables-min

18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet

With most things in life, the key is ‘everything in moderation.’ Not that this means you can eat pizza in moderation, but you get my point. One thing that certainly shouldn't be moderated however is your intake of delicious, fresh veggies. We could all benefit from upping our vegetable intake, and certainly shouldn't be aiming for the paltry ‘5 portions a day’ recommended by so called ‘experts.’ If you’re running out of ways to boost your veggie intake, why not give some of these ideas a try?

18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet paleo primal vegetables-min


Use them in:

Hide them in:

  • Sauces – like this romesco sauce or as a base to a Paleo pizza
  • Baked goods, like these sweet potato and chocolate chip muffins
  • Omelettes – try a spinach and red pepper omelette for a delicious breakfast
  • Dips – why not try replacing the basil with spinach or kale in pesto?
  • Curries – Why not throw some sweet potato, squash, courgette or mushrooms into your curry?
  • Stews / Casseroles – You can ever add some extra veggies like onions, parsnips and carrots and blend them up to make a delicious fresh sauce

Make Paleo Alternatives:

  • Make Paleo Tortillas with Lettuce Wraps
  • Make Paleo Noodles with Courgettes – you may need a spiralizer!
  • Make Paleo Spaghetti with a Spaghetti Squash
  • Make Paleo Rice with Cauliflower

Eat lots of salad!

  • Making your own salad is a great way to consume loads of fresh, colourful veggies in one sitting. You can throw together all sorts of leafy greens, tomatoes, peppers, cucumber, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, avocado – just about anything really!

Snack on them raw

  • Carrots, Cucumber, Celery and Peppers make excellent nibbles at snack time. Spread them with a little almond butter for a little indulgence if you like!

Make a vegetable based broth

  • This is an excellent way to use up all your leftover vegetables – simply throw them all into a pot and cook very gently for a delicious broth!

Go to your farmers market

  • A trip to your local farmers market can make you see vegetables in a whole new light. The colours, shapes and sizes of the produce on offer will be outstanding, and might just reignite your passion for vegetables. An otherwise boring tomato or bunch of kale will probably look much more fun here – so stock up at your local farmers market, and aim to walk away with at least one new vegetable.

How do you get extra veggies in your diet? Are there any ideas I have missed?

paleo_recipe_7_minute salmon poached_perfect

Recipe: 7 Minute Salmon

Salmon is great in so many things – recently I’ve been having a lot of salmon salads. I’ve tried lots of different ways of cooking it, but I think I’ve got the perfect method – and best of all, it takes just 7 minutes on the stove. I find this method far more consistant than frying or baking, as it always turns out well. This poaching technique is quick and cooks the fish through, but it remains tender. I tend to make up more than I need, as it’s fine to keep in the fridge for up to 3 days, making for a quick lunch option.

I’m quite careful about the fish I get and avoid farmed fish. Look out for wild fish where you can.

Recipe: 7 Minute Salmon
Recipe type: Fish & Seafood
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
  • 4 wild salmon fillets
  • 3 spring onions, trimmed
  • 2 teaspoons whole black peppercorns
  • Squeeze of fresh lime
  • Sea salt
  1. In a pan just big enough to accommodate the fish, arrange the fillets so they don’t overlap, and cover with cold water until they are immersed.
  2. Add the spring onions, peppercorns and lime, then the sea salt.
  3. Bring the water to the boil and as soon as it starts to boil, turn the fillets over and remove the pan from the heat. Leave the pan to stand for 7 minutes.
  4. After 7 minutes, take the salmon out of the pan and leave to cool completely. Once the salmon is cool it will be cooked to perfection.


Enter your details and check your email!

How do you cook Salmon (and other fish?) I’d love to hear your tips in the comments below.

fail-proof poached chicken paleo recipe shredded poultry lunch dinner-min

Recipe: fail-proof poached chicken

I don’t know about you, but I find chicken cooked in the oven can be a bit dry and fried chicken can be a little greasy (not to mention make an complete mess of the kitchen) , so lately I've been poaching chicken instead. This is my favourite way to cook chicken that I'm going to be shredding, or adding to a recipe that calls for pre-cooked chicken.

Recipe: fail-proof poached chicken
  • Chicken (as much as your recipe calls for)
  • A splash of white wine
  • Water
  • A couple of bay leaves
  • A small piece of fresh ginger
  • A few black peppercorns
  • Sea salt
  1. Dice the chicken up into roughly equal sized pieces.
  2. Arrange the chicken at the bottom of a pan, trying to make sure none of the pieces overlap
  3. Pour the wine over first, then add cold water until the chicken is completely submerged by about 5cm of water.
  4. Throw in the bay leaves, ginger, peppercorns, then season.
  5. Bring the water to a boil, then when it boils reduce the heat and allow it to simmer.
  6. If you’re going to use the liquid, you’ll want to spoon off the scum that will come to the top.
  7. Simmer the chicken for a few minutes until thoroughly cooked. Ideally, you’ll want to use a meat thermometer to ensure it’s cooked all the way through before removing from the heat, otherwise, test the largest piece to ensure it’s cooked all the way through, and the juices run clear.
  8. Once cooked, drain the chicken pieces and shred, or use as they are.


Enter your details and check your email!

fail-proof poached chicken paleo recipe shredded poultry lunch dinner-min

Recipe paleo egg muffins-min

Recipe: Paleo Egg Muffins

Egg Muffins are a win for quick and easy breakfast options. When I make them I make a big batch and keep them in the fridge.

I use whatever vegetables I have left over, so you can go as plain or complex as you like.


Recipe: Paleo Egg Muffins
Recipe type: Breakfast
  • 1 Onion, diced
  • Large spoon of coconut oil
  • Broccoli, diced
  • Handful of Mushrooms, sliced
  • Large bowl of spinach
  • 6 Eggs
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Handful of grated cheese (if primal, completely optional)
  1. Fry the onions in some coconut oil over a medium heat
  2. When the onions soften, add in the broccoli, then the spinach
  3. Meanwhile beat the eggs and season
  4. Arrange the muffin cases and spoon the vegetables into the bottom of each case
  5. Add a pinch of grated cheese to each case (if desired, otherwise leave out)
  6. Spoon in the egg mixture
  7. Bake in the oven at 175C (350F) for about 45 minutes
  8. Enjoy or store in the fridge to enjoy for breakfast tomorrow


How to cut a bell pepper capsicum technique paleo-min

How to cut a bell pepper

How do you cut yours? I always used to get seeds everywhere when I cut up a capsicum (or bell pepper as they're known elsewhere in the world), until I found this technique. No mess, no wastage – and best of all the seeds stay together and can be easily removed.

Tutorial How To Cut Bell Pepper Capsicum-min

So all you need to do is:

  • Cut the top and bottom off the bell pepper/ capsicum
  • Next to one of the white sections, connecting the outside to the seeds, make a cut down
  • Open out the side of the pepper/ capsicum, cutting away the pieces attached to the centre as you go
  • Remove the seed section
  • Put out the stalk from the top of the capsicum/ bell pepper
  • Now you have three clean sections to cut up!

How do you cut yours? I'd love to hear any good techniques that you use, in the comments below!

9 ways to keep it paleo at Christmas holiday diet health-min

9 Ways to Keep it Paleo This Christmas

With all of the festivities at this time of year, you might be worried about keeping it Paleo? Well, with a bit of planning and organisation, there’s no need to worry about foregoing your health this Christmas.

  • Remember how you feel after you eat gluten/ drink alcohol/ eat something that doesn't agree with you.
  • Organise to host your own party/ dinner, early, to ensure you have control over the menu. You’ll be surprised how many friends will ask you for the recipes!
  • If you’re going out of Christmas events try eating before you leave, as when hunger strikes it’s harder to avoid the bad options
  • Call the venue ahead to check on the menu options, and see how they can accommodate you. You’ll find many places happy to tweak their Christmas menu to accommodate.
  • If you’re going to a friend's event, bring your own dishes to ensure there will be some good options you can have
  • Don’t let anyone pressure you into eating badly – often people seem keen to sabotage the good efforts of others (perhaps because it makes them feel better about their own bad choices) – so be prepared!
  • Don’t be afraid to lie – sometimes it’s just easier to say you have an allergy or intolerance instead of explaining why you eat this way (have you ever done this?)
  • If you have the chance to organise a Christmas event yourself, choose a venue with more paleo options – or better still arrange an event that isn't based around food.

And finally:

  • If you do fall off the wagon, tomorrow is another day. Don’t beat yourself up over it – but don’t let the slip justify more bad eating! Move on and eat well again.

How do you find sticking to a Paleo diet at this time of year? What are your top tips for success?

9 ways to keep it paleo at Christmas holiday diet health-min

Which Knives Do You Need In Your Kitchen paleo cooking diet primal knife choosing-min

Which Knives Do You Need In Your Kitchen?

Eating a natural paleo diet – more real food – means more food preparation. Which knives do you have in your kitchen and are you using the right ones for the right job?

One of the most important tools in the kitchen is the knife. You use your kitchen knifes every day and if you buy good ones, you will be able to use them for many years to come.

If you’re about to buy a kitchen knife, have you worked out which type you need and what to buy?

It’s not easy to say a particular knife “is the best knife”. The best knife depends on you and how you will use it. The most important criteria is that the knife should be easy to use by the person who will use it the most.

When you walk into a shop, you’ll probably be overwhelmed by the amount and variety of knifes. Don’t worry, you will never use all of them, nobody does. A basic set of knifes for in the kitchen usually consists of 3 to 6 different knifes.

What you need to know about kitchen knives:

Wrought knives

Some people say that the best knifes are wrought. Whilst this used to be the only way to make steel suitable for making knives, it’s no longer the case. Nowadays, techniques are much more developed and even the steel is different. A knife doesn’t need to consist of one piece either, this has no added value for it’s cutting abilities.


The hardness of the knife is an indication for the speed a knife can get blunt. Knife hardness is expressed in Rockwell C (HRC). Generally, the higher the hardness, the longer the knife stays sharp. However, the steel can get more susceptible to chipping of the cutting edge (the steel gets brittle) and to the occurrence of rust.

Which Knives Do You Need In Your Kitchen paleo cooking diet primal knife choosing-min

The handle

When choosing a kitchen knife, always look for the construction of the handle. If you want to be able to put your knives in the dishwasher (but please wash by hand!), choose knifes with a molded on handle or welded on handle of stainless steel. Knifes with a riveted handle are less adequate for a dishwasher. Wood and the dishwasher are of course not the best combination either.

There are five knifes that are completely indispensable in a paleo kitchen:

Chef’s knifes

A knife collection always starts with a chef’s knife. A chef’s knife has a high blade with a slightly rounded cutting edge, used for cutting meat, fish and vegetables. This knife is less suitable for the smaller carvings, you’d be better use a paring knife for that.

Chef’s knifes are usually used for cutting everything that is raw, before it goes into the pan, such as meat and fish – but also vegetables or cheese. Thanks to the large blade, it’s easy to cut onions and herbs without hitting the cutting board all the time. The most selected size is 20cm, but some people (mainly women) choose a smaller size.

Paring knifes

This knife has a small blade with a sharp point, suitable for peeling and cutting smaller vegetables and fruits. The knife comes in various sizes, between 8 – 12cm. One of the biggest mistakes people make is to use this knife for everything!

Tomato knife

The third knife that you should get is a tomato knife. It always has a small serrated blade and you use it for cutting vegetables with a rigid outside and a soft inside, such as tomatoes.

Boning knife

A boning knife has a long low blade with a smooth surface. You can use it to cut meat, fish and poultry into equal slices.

Every knife, no matter how good or expensive it was, gets blunt. Consider buying a knife grinder, or taking your knives to get professionally sharpened. To keep your knives in good condition, wash them by hand, instead of using the dishwasher!

Which knives do you have in your kitchen? Have you found a good brand? Please share your tips in the comments below.

Paleo recipe how to make perfect roast chicken bake-min

Recipe: How To Make A Perfect Roast Chicken

Roast Chicken, done right is delicious and tender, but with a crispy skin. Far too often though, the meat is dry, tough and stringy, and the skin soft.

With rotisserie chickens available just about everywhere, the art of roasting a chicken seems to be disappearing – which is a shame because it is so easy!

The most important thing with roasting a chicken – is the chicken! Getting a really good quality organic, free-range chicken will put you on the path to success. A good quality chicken is also the best bet if you want to make use of the carcass for making a chicken stock.

My method couldn’t be a any simpler, so next time you go to get a rotisserie chicken, why not try this instead?

Roast Chicken Ingredients

  • Chicken (ideally organic, free-range and pasture raised)
  • A lemon
  • Fresh thyme
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 50ml (2 fl oz) olive oil
  • Sea salt & fresh ground black pepper

How To Make Roast Chicken

Preheat the oven to 200C (400F)

Rinse the chicken and remove the giblets. Dry the chicken using kitchen paper.

Cut the lemon in half and sandwich a sprig of the thyme in the middle. Put the lemon inside the chicken cavity.

Skin and crush the garlic cloves and add to a food processor with the leaves of the remaining thyme and the olive oil and blend together.

Massage the olive oil mixture into the chicken thoroughly, ensuring it is completely covered.

Put the bird into a roasting tray, and top with any remaining oil. Season with salt and pepper.

Cover the chicken loosely with foil and roast for 30 minutes.

Reduce the temperature to 170C (330F) and remove the foil and roast for a further 20 minutes, or until the juices run clear when the bird is pierced with a skewer.

Turn off the oven, but allow the chicken to rest in the hot oven for ten minutes, before removing from the oven to carve.

Pour the juices from the roasting tray over the sliced chicken to serve, or set aside to make a gravy. The carcass can be used to make a chicken stock.

Enjoy – and please share your roasting tips and tricks in the comments below!

Paleo recipe how to make perfect roast chicken bake-min

How To Make Perfect Pork Crackling rind scratchings recipe-min

Recipe: How To Make Perfect Pork Crackling

I love Pork Crackling (which you may know as Pork Rinds or Pork Scratchings, depending on where you’re from). But it’s often a disappointment, either soft and underdone, or burn and completely wasted! But when it’s crunch and crackly, it is so good.

Pork crackling is obviously mainly fat, which makes it the perfect Paleo snack. Just a small amount is extremely satiating, so you can easily cook enough to last for many servings. Whilst you can buy them, one look at the ingredients (not to mention the uncertainty about the quality of the pork used) will probably tell you to get in the kitchen and make your own!

I’ve been trying to work out the best way to get perfect Pork crackling, which I’ll share with you below.
Firstly with Pork, perhaps more so than any other meat, quality really counts. I always go for Pasture Raised* pork and am careful to buy the best quality I can. If I could only buy one type of meat organic and pasture raised, without doubt I would choose pork.

You can use a few different cuts, blade or a roasting joint work well, but my favourite is Pork belly.
How To Make Perfect Pork Crackling rind scratchings recipe-min

How To Make Perfect Pork Crackling:

Dry the skin thoroughly (use a paper towel).

With a sharp knife, score the skin, leaving the cuts about a finger width apart. Go for either diagonal stripes, or make a diamond pattern. Make sure you score through the skin, but not through to the meat.

This might sound odd, but pour boiling water over the skin – and don’t panic about the fact it doesn’t make it look good.

Dry the skin thoroughly once more, then rub sea salt into it (I tend to use Himalayan or Celtic sea salt). Make sure the salt gets right through, into the cracks. Some people add oil here, but I’ve had great results without, so don’t.

If you can, leave the salted pork in the fridge overnight.

When ready to cook, add more salt to the skin and cook in a very hot oven for about 15 minutes per kilo. I start at 180C, the in the last 15 minutes of cooking, turn the oven up to about 240C.

Please share your tips below, I know almost everyone seems to have a slightly technique.

*Pigs will tend to eat lots of different foods – not just grass, which is why grass-fed isn’t a term used to refer to pork and other pig related products. “Pasture raised” means they’ve been raised to eat their natural diet, which may include whatever they find as they roam about the pasture – grass, bugs, corn, fruit, veggies, weeds etc.
Making a Non-Paleo Lunch Menu Paleo diet healthy ideas replacements-min

Making a Non-Paleo Lunch Menu Paleo

I went out for a farewell lunch with my team today.  We went to a bar in the city centre, with a fairly typical bar menu. So – a Paleo Lunch?

I'm quite happy to go almost anywhere to eat, with the knowledge that on most menus, with a bit of staff interaction, a Paleo meal can be put together.

I start by ruling out any predominately grain based meals, such as pasta, pizza, pies and sandwiches.  Of the remaining dishes I'm usually left with a few meaty options, of which I’ll try to identify the least likely to be fried (typically in vegetable oil), processed, coated (gluten), or marinated (often in sauces containing ingredients like gluten and sugar).  Unless the menu is extremely limited I also rule out salads and vegetable based options, as I don’t find them filling and they often have many ingredients I wouldn't eat (like dressings, sauces, cheese and croutons).

At this stage today I was left with these options: –

  • Slow braised lamb shanks served with minted rich gravy & mash
  • Surf & Turf. 200g rump steak, prawns sautéed in garlic served with chive butter, fries and salad.
  • Grilled Barramundi fillet with creamy mash & asparagus served with a hollandise sauce.
  • Lamb Cutlets served with creamy mash, olive pesto & wholegrain mustard cream

I generally look at all of the menu options and mix and match my chosen meat with the vegetable and salad sides on offer with other meals.  I've not yet been to a restaurant unable to accommodate my Paleo mix and match requests.  Had there not been so many good options, I would have also considered things like the burger (without the bun, fries or sauces).

Paleoising-Lunch mix match making paleo

My Mix and Match Paleo Lunch

I went for the lamb shanks, as I knew they should be unprocessed and not fried.  I asked for the lamb to come without the mash and sauce, but with plain vegetables instead.  It arrived with roasted eggplant, capsicum, zucchini & mushroom (luckily I've not started my nightshade elimination experiment yet), which was a perfect Paleo meal.

I find pubs, bars and steak houses the easiest places in which to eat out, where there is usually a lot of reasonable options to choose from.  A good Indian restaurant is often a surprisingly good choice too.  I always ask the staff exactly what is in each dish, and there are often tomato based sauces or dry cooked meats, which are a great Paleo option.  In my experience Chinese and Japanese can be a bit more testing.  Quite often I actually find it easier to say I'm allergic to soy and gluten and ask for the staff to help me find a suitable option.

One of the things I enjoy about going off-menu, is the inevitable discussions it provokes from my pasta-eating dining companions – an excuse to talk Paleo is always welcomed.

How do you get a Paleo meal from a non-Paleo option?  Do you find some types of restaurant better than others?  I’d love to find out what tricks I'm missing!

Making a Non-Paleo Lunch Menu Paleo diet healthy ideas replacements-min