Can you live on just light breatharianism circadian rhythm meditation paleo diet natural-min

Can You Live On Just Light?

I read recently about a woman, Naveena Shine, 65, from Seattle, who was planning to go for six months without eating, existing solely on “nutrition” from the sun; Sungazing. She installed video cameras in her house, with live streaming, to prove that she wasn't cheating. After losing a lot of weight, she stopped after 47 days, as she feared she was encouraging others to copy her – without having the resources in place to do so safely.

Looking into sungazing and breatharianism, there are a lot of people around the World, who genuinely believe it is possible to live – and nourish your body – without eating.

Can you live on just light breatharianism circadian rhythm meditation paleo diet natural-min

What is Sungazing?

The idea behind sungazing is to gain increased energy, more awareness, and clearer thinking. It is a practice where you take a few minutes out of your day and focus on the rising or setting sun. As the sun is so crucial for our circadian rhythms – which are crucial for so many functions, this seems quite in line with a Paleo lifestyle. Who wouldn't benefit from getting away from artificial lighting and getting some natural sunlight. Sungazing actually involves doing just that – gazing directly at the sun – which is why it is so controversial. A lot of people, understandably, say this can cause serious long term damage to your eyes. Sungazers start off slowly focusing on the sun for a few seconds at sunrise and sunset initially (rather than when the sun is at it’s strongest at midday). Gradually they increase this time, until after a few months they are focusing on the sun for several minutes at a time.

Whilst focusing on the sun, sungazers practice meditation.

Looking directly into the sun does not seem like a remotely good idea – but being in the sun – and connecting with the Earth at sunrise and sunset must be a good thing. Not only does being in the sun give a Vitamin D boost (and at a far safer time of day, as the sun is not so strong), it is a great way to reset your body clock. I’d also speculate this would significantly help transform sleep patterns.

As for the not eating part, I can’t see any benefit in that. Whilst an occasional intermittent fast seems to be beneficial – going without food for long periods of time, can’t be a good thing.

I’d love to hear what you think about Sungazing. Completely ridiculous, or is there an element of truth in it? Leave your comments, below.

Are You Deficient in Copper paleo diet primal supplement sources-min

Are You Deficient in Copper?

Copper is an important trace dietary mineral which fulfils many important functions within the body.

Many of the proteins and enzymes that perform essential metabolic functions contain copper. It is important for the growth, development and maintenance of bone, ligaments and many organs. It also works as part of the immune system to fight infections and can neutralize free radicals – molecules with unpaired valence electrons that can cause damage to cells in the body.
Copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin in mollusks and crustaceans, and is involved with the production of hemoglobin in vertebrates, including mammals and humans. It is also important for keeping bones, muscles, nerves and the immune system healthy.

What Does Copper Do?

Copper has several important uses within the body. One of the most important roles is in the production of bone and connective tissue. It also works with iron to help the body to produce red blood cells. People who have a deficiency can suffer from anaemia and osteoporosis.
The human body has a homeostatic mechanism that deals with copper. This attempts to give the body a continual supply of copper while eliminating excess amounts of copper. Consuming too much or too little copper can lead to health problems, so it is always best to eat the correct amount.
Are You Deficient in Copper paleo diet primal supplement sources-min

Food Sources of Copper

Like many essential minerals, copper is available through both plant and animal sources. Many of these are compatible with the paleo diet, including liver pâté, which is probably the best source with just a 12g portion of liver pâté providing 100% of your recommended daily intake. Liver pâté is an amazing super-food!
As well as being a supposed aphrodisiac, oysters are also a great source of copper. Lobster and calamari are other good seafood source of copper.
Other important sources of copper include:
·         Nuts, particularly cashew nuts
·         Sesame seeds and tahini
·         Pumpkin and squash seeds
·         Sunflower seeds
·         Prunes
·         Sun-dried tomatoes

Problems Associated with Copper Intake

Whilst copper is an essential mineral that your body needs, it is also toxic in large quantities. An inherited condition, called Wilson’s disease, can cause deposits of copper in the liver, brain and other organs. These copper deposits can lead to the development of hepatitis, kidney problems and brain disorders.
Copper deficiency can be a major problem for the human body. As it is an essential ingredient for many bodily functions, having low levels can seriously affect your health. Anemia is a common side effect, due to the reduced rate of producing red blood cells. Osteoporosis can also result from copper deficiency and problems with the immune system.
As an important dietary mineral, it is important to consume your recommended daily amount of copper.
Do you eat many of the foods that provide copper? Have you ever had your mineral levels checked? I'd love to hear your thoughts, in the comments below.
Gelatin – The Secret Superfood bone broth paleo primal nutrition healthy-min

Gelatin – The Secret Superfood

Forget Goji Berries, Spirulina and Peruvian Maca Root, there is one ‘Superfood’ that you can guarantee your ancestors would have consumed in abundance that you’re probably not getting enough of now – Gelatin. As conventional wisdom has seen us spurn traditional cuts in favour of lean muscle meat, our intake of gelatin has dropped to almost zero. However, the body still craves it – and here’s why.

Found in the connective tissue, bones and cartilage of animals, gelatin is extremely nourishing in a number of ways. It is the best source of dietary collagen, which has been proven to increase the elasticity of the skin and therefore keep you looking young. In fact, the amino acid profile of gelatin, in combination with its high levels of collagen make for great support for healthy skin, hair and nails. It contains 6 grams of protein per tablespoon – and whilst not a complete protein in itself, it helps create a more balanced amino acid profile when taken with other proteins and therefore optimise assimilation. Maybe that’s why roast beef and gravy taste so good!

Gelatin is also fantastic for anyone who suffers from digestive problems. It is unique in the way in which it attracts water molecules during digestion, consequently improving the rate in which food moves through the digestive tract. What’s more, gelatin has been proved to carry gut healing properties, and has been shown to reduce the likelihood of developing a food allergy or intolerance. Strongly anti-inflammatory, Gelatin has also shown to play a significant part in healing Asthma, Chron’s and Colitis.

Gelatin – The Secret Superfood bone broth paleo primal nutrition healthy-min

How to increase your intake

The obvious way to increase your intake of gelatin is by making your own home made stock and bone broth. Pay a visit to your local butchers, and pick up any gelatin rich cuts you can lay your hands on – chicken and pigs feet, ox tail, or even any leftover bones they have out the back. Simmer them very gently for at least 24 hours in a stock pot with hot water, herbs and veggies, and you’ll have plenty of nourishing broth to see you through the week. Drink it as it is, or use it as a base for soups, sauces and gravies.

If time and logistics are against you making your own bone broth, consider taking a high quality gelatin supplement. You can add this by the spoonful to smoothies, or make your own Paleo approved gummies by using gelatin and fruit juice!

Paleo Diet Primal Better Skin Care Acne Eczema Spots Breakouts-min

Paleo for Better Skin

I've read about so many people going onto a paleo diet and noticing significant improvements in their skin. With a few tweaks, eating this way seems to have helped a lot of people suffering from acne, eczema, spots, redness, blemishes and breakouts.

Paleo Diet Primal Better Skin Care Acne Eczema Spots Breakouts-min

What causes skin problems?

It seems that a lot of issues are down to inflammation. Of course, grains are inflammatory, so removing them from the diet – and being very strict and vigilant, especially where gluten is concerned, will make a big difference.
Gut health and permeability also appear to be significant factors in skin. Heal your gut – and heal your complexion.
Hormones are another big factor. Eating foods like soy can interfere with hormones – so obviously following a paleo protocol (and ditching those legumes) will mitigate this issue.

Natural skin care

The chemicals in many of the commercial products are frightening. Lots of people on the paleo community swear by coconut oil.

Eat more fat

Getting over fear of fat seems to have helped many people with their skin issues. Try to get more fat in your diet – from good Paleo sources, of course.


Another paleo skin cure seems to be bone broth. Regularly consuming a high quality home made bone broth could be what is standing between you and beautiful blemish free, glowing, skin!
Liz Wolfe has produced a natural, paleo skin care guide, called “The Skintervention Guide“, so if you're still have problems with your complexion – and want to find a natural solutions, you can check it out here.

Has your skin changed since you went paleo? Please share your tips in the comments below!
Paleo Primal Fatty Acids Omega 3 Omega 6 Ratio fish-min

Omega 3 and Omega 6 – How’s Your Ratio?

Omega 3 and 6 (Sometimes referred to as N3 and N6) are spoken about a lot with reference to the Paleo diet – but just what are they – and how can you make sure you are getting the right ratio?

Omega 3 is a fatty acid which is essential in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle and reduce the risk of suffering from any chronic illnesses, such as cardiovascular and mental disease. There has been overwhelming research which has concluded that Omega 3 can help to reduce blood pressure, inflammation and can be beneficial in preventing mental illnesses such as depression. Omega 3 may not only prevent these illnesses but can also help to reduce the chances of these developing and becoming more serious.

Whilst Omega 6 has health benefits too, this fatty acid is required in far lower quantities, or it becomes detrimental.

The introduction of these fatty acids can be beneficial for people who suffer from illnesses such as arthritis as they are thought to act as an anti-inflammatory. These two fatty acids should be combined at the right ratio within the diet in order to improve health and well-being.

As the Paleo diet encourages the consumption of plenty of fish and seafood, it can really help those who follow the diet to eat a high amount of Omega 3. It is highly important within the diet to get the ratio of Omega 3 and Omega 6 right, as a good balance is an essential way to ensure these are providing the best possible benefits. It appears that by getting the ratios wrong and eating too much of the Omega 6 and too little Omega 3 can actually result in a negative effect on health.

Paleo Primal Fatty Acids Omega 3 Omega 6 Ratio fish-min

The ratio should be around 2:1 for Omega 3: Omega 6 but many people consume far too much of Omega 6, which can be detrimental to the body. Omega 6 is found in abundance with sugar and processed foods, but is also found in nuts and butters but in much lower quantities. Clearly when following a SAD diet, laden with these processed foods, it is very easy for the N3:N6 ratio to skew heavily in favour of Omega 6. Not good. Whilst a Paleo diet is naturally going to promote a healthier ratio of these fatty acids, it is no “guaranteed”, so it is important to monitor the fats you are eating to ensure the ratio remains healthy.

There are ways to improve the ratio of both of these fatty acids, by eating foods which have a good balance between the two. Free range eggs and grass-fed meat offer a balance between both, which means they are very beneficial in improving overall health. Mono-unsaturated and saturated fats such as olive oil and coconut oil which are keenly consumed within the Paleo diet also provide a good source for both of these fatty acids and will help to keep the ratio at the proper level. You can also buy free range (often organic) eggs, which are high in Omega 3 (as the hens are fed a diet rich in these fatty acids)

We have been encouraged for some time to increase our consumption of fresh fish and seafood as they offer a wealth of benefits to the body and the main reason for this is the fact that these are rich in Omega-3. As a powerful antioxidant, Omega-3 is essential to have as part of a healthy lifestyle.

Do you monitor your Omega 3/ Omega 6 ratio? What do you do to ensure the ratios remain at a good level?

The Paleo Diet Serotonin Depression-min

Serotonin & The Paleo Diet

We have probably all heard the word serotonin, but usually in relation to going to the gym or doing another form of exercise. It is true to say that exercise boots serotonin levels in the brain, which is why we feel better after a workout, even if it was a bit of a struggle to get there. Serotonin is what is often referred to as the feel good transmitter as it plays a huge part in how happy we feel and if the levels of serotonin in our brain are too low, it can often lead to depression.

Depression is the result of an imbalance of hormones and exists when the neurological system is not functioning as it should be. There are many people who also believe that depression is related to inflammation in the body, which can also cause other illnesses. There is a strong relation between the body and the mind, which is why we need to take care of our bodies, in order to feel balanced and happy in the mind.

Depression can really take over a persons’ life and stop them enjoying important stages of their lives. It is a type of mental illness which can cause the sufferer to become suppressed and even stop going out completely. There are many people who turn to their doctors when they feel themselves becoming depressed and the answer is often a bottle of anti-depressants. These may help in the short term but they can be addictive, so much so that the user may not be able to come off them. It is important to realise the connection between body and mind and take care of our diets as a way of ensuring we don’t suffer from depression.

The Paleo Diet Serotonin Depression-min

As the Paleo diet involves eating the right balance of foods which reduce inflammation and lift serotonin levels, it can be hugely effective in combating an illness such as depression. A diet which is rich in Omega 3 is thought to be a way of reducing and fighting depression as it contains lots of anti-oxidants which help us to maintain a healthy lifestyle. The oil in fish is a natural method of combating depression and can be found in lots of tasty foods such as salmon, tuna and seafood.

It is important to eat foods which reduce inflammation in the body as this is thought to increase our chances of suffering from mental illnesses such as depression. The Paleo diet is a way to achieve this by stocking up on vegetables, fruit and fish and staying away from candy and crisps. Inflammation is not only significant in the effects on the brain but it can also increase the likelihood of suffering from other serious illnesses such as cancer and diabetes.

Foods which contain high levels of protein can also be beneficial in lifting our moods, as they contain amino acids which are known to improve our neurotransmitters. The proper functioning of the neurotransmitters is the way to maintain a healthy mind and as a result, a healthy body.

In order to raise our serotonin levels and ensure we feel healthier from the inside to the outside, we need to look at the natural way of achieving this, rather than reaching for tablets. A healthy diet, together with a combination of exercise, can go a long way to helping us to feel healthier and happier for the rest of our lives. We can change our diet to incorporate healthier food groups, such as meat, fish, vegetables and fruit, at any stage of our lives and it will still have a huge effect on our health.

It is not a case of depriving yourself when following the Paleo diet; it is a method of eating lots of all of the right foods which are natural enhancers of serotonin levels, as well as helping us to achieve a healthy weight. Food plays a huge part in our lives and as such, it is essential to get it right.

Low Protein High Protein paleo macronutrient ratios-min

Low Protein? High Protein?

In case you didn't already know, dietary protein is essential for human health. Protein is used in the body to build and maintain new tissue such as muscle, hair, nails, skin, bone and blood cells. It is also required to create the enzymes for the body to carry out certain processes, such as the digestion of food; and neurotransmitters, which control your ability to carry out basic tasks (like thought and movement). US dietary guidelines recommend a daily intake of 45g per day for females, and 55g per day for males. In reality, you need much more to maintain optimum health, especially if you’re active. But just how much should you be taking in? And is it possible to consume too much?

Put simply, the amount of protein you need is unique to each individual. For a sedentary person, Many sources recommend around 1g of protein per kilo of bodyweight as a realistic amount needed to maintain lean mass. If you’re more active, you’ll be looking at around 1.5g – and if you’re lifting (and looking to increase lean muscle mass), between 1.8g and 2.0g per kilo of bodyweight is optimal. For example, a 70kg man training three times per week and looking to increase his muscle mass should be targeting between 130g and 140g of protein per day. That’s the equivalent of around 3 eggs, one chicken breast, a handful of almonds and one sirloin steak – so is by no means reaching into the realms of ‘forced’ protein.

Low Protein High Protein paleo macronutrient ratios-min

Indeed, if protein forms the majority of your caloric intake, then you’re probably consuming too much. Fat should be your main source of energy, with between 15 and 25% coming from protein. Too much protein can create excess toxins in the body, and put a significant strain on the liver and heart. Not ideal.

Chances are, your Paleo diet already features a respectable amount of protein and you’ll probably be achieving your protein ‘target’ without even knowing it. Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts and seeds are all good sources of this macro-nutrient. Amino acids, the building blocks of protein, are found in plants as well – albeit in various quantities. If a food contains all of the ‘essential’ amino acids, then this food is considered a ‘complete’ protein. As plant protein sources are normally lacking in at least one of the essential amino acids, they are usually considered as ‘incomplete’ protein. This is one of the reasons it is hard for vegans to consume adequate protein, and leads to them having to selectively combine foods to achieve a complete amino acid profile.

To conclude, it is probably much better you focus on the quality of the protein you are taking in rather than the quantity. Don’t worry too much about hitting a ‘target amount’ – simply build each meal around a high quality protein source like red meat, poultry, fish or eggs. Consume extra if you’re active, especially on training days. But don’t stress yourself out about it; you’re much more likely to be getting a solid amount of protein each day simply by eating real foods.

Paleo Diet Primal Is Your Deodorant Toxic Antiperspirant spray-min

Is Your Deodorant Toxic?

When you put so much care and effort into your Paleo nutrition and fitness, are you equally aware of the health and beauty products you use, like your deodorant?

Deodorant and antiperspirant are something most people use – and apply directly onto their skin every day, but is commercial deodorant safe?

Shop brought deodorants often contain parabens – a chemical that has been associated with cancers. Deodorants often also contain aluminium, which is used to stop perspiration – but has been linked to dementia, brain disorders and breast cancer.

It is also common for deodorants to contain alcohol, which can be drying for some skin types.
While aluminium free and paraben free deodorants are available, these can still come with added alcohols or other chemicals that could build up in the body. There are many natural deodorants available, for example made from crystal stones. However – you could make your own natural alternative!

Deodorant For Women


  • Five teaspoons of distilled witch hazel
  • 5mls (0.17 fluid ounces) of vitamin E oil
  • 10 – 20 drops of geranium essential oil
  • 10 – 20 drops of ylang ylang essential oil
  • 5 drops of clary sage
  • One small spritzer bottle


Add the witch hazel into a small mixing bowl and then add in the vitamin E oil and blend it together using the end of a pipette, a teaspoon, or a small wooden spatula.

Next add the essential oils and remember to build them gradually until you have the desired scent. Once ready, pour into the spritzer body and use when need. This can be stored in the fridge for a cooling effect.

Deodorant for Men


  • 5 teaspoons of distilled witch hazel
  • 10 – 20 drops of sandalwood essential oil
  • 10 – 20 drops of pine essential oil
  • 5mls (0.17 fluid ounces) of vitamin E oil
  • One small spritzer bottle

Follow the directions for the deodorant for women.

If preferred, just use the sandalwood essential oil on its own.

Solid Deodorant

Warning: Take care when heating and pouring the cocoa butter to ensure it doesn’t get on your hands as it will be extremely hot.


  • 30g (1.05 ounce) of cocoa butter or shea butter
  • Essential oils as listed in the above recipes
  • 5mls of vitamin E oil
  • Square soap mould or massage bar mould


Melt the butter in a saucepan by lightly heating it on a hob or in a microwave oven until melted.

Stir in the vitamin E oil and then added in the essential oils.

Pour the mix into soap or massage bar mould. For a smooth bar, use a soap mould.

Leave the bar to cool overnight and it will be ready to use the next morning.

Bicarbonate of soda can also be used for a simple, effective deodorant.

Note: Pregnant women should take advice before using essential oils.

Do you use commercial deodorant or antiperspirant – or perhaps you go without entirely? I’d love to hear your thoughts on this – and whether you’d try making a natural alternative – in the comments below.

Paleo Diet Primal Is Your Deodorant Toxic Antiperspirant spray-min

Paleo Diet Primal Olive Oil Extra Virgin Fake Test Quality Label-min

Are You Using Fake Olive Oil?

Olive oil is one of the healthier oils around, because it’s full of nutrients and antioxidants. Using high quality ‘extra virgin’ olive oil is pretty standard on a Paleo diet. But just how good is the olive oil in your kitchen?

Apparently some olive oils are not all they seem…

Olive oil comes in different categories: ‘Extra virgin’, ‘virgin’, ‘fine virgin’, (normal) ‘olive oil’ and ‘pomace’. ‘Extra virgin’ is the label put on an oil containing less than 1% acid.

Recent research from the Olive Institute (University of California in Davis) revealed that more than half of the olive oils presently on the market are bad quality. Often, despite what they label says, it is not always ‘extra virgin’ olive oil and is sometimes mixed with cheaper oils like hazelnut oils or even soybean oil! Sometimes the oil can be made from overripe and rotting olives. This olive oil does not have any nutritional or health benefits and can even be harmful…

Olives are fruits, making it a very unique oil. Olives are drupaceous (stone fruits), like prunes and cherries. The oil is made with a simple hydraulic press, much like the one we use for fruit juices. This in contrast to the “vegetable” oils, which are made in a refinery with the use of solvents, heat and high pressure – not very natural!

Paleo Diet Primal Olive Oil Extra Virgin Fake Test Quality Label-min

Olive oil is made gently which is why it keeps the ‘extra virgin’ quality, full of antioxidants in the forms of polyphenols and sterols, and vitamins E and K. Olive oil contains large quantities of CoQ10, an antioxidant which is very effective in protecting our heart and fighting chronic inflammations.

Choosing a Good Quality Olive Oil

It’s really important to make sure the olive oil you use is good quality – and really is what it says it is only the label. There are a few ways you can get more certainty about the olive oil you buy:

  • Develop a taste for olive oil. There are course and tasting session run, which will help you get a feel for what it should taste like. This will help you identify if the oil you purchase is a good one.
  • Buy only brands that are certified by trustworthy organisations.
  • If possible, buy directly from the olive growers and producers.
  • You might have heard about the refrigerator test: when you put olive oil in the fridge, it should solidify. If it doesn’t solidify, you could be dealing with a mixture of oils. BUT! This test is not 100% trustworthy, as some very high quality olive oils will not solidify.

If you’re not happy with some olive oil that you’ve purchased – return it – and try another brand.

How do you choose a good olive oil and what do you use it for? Do you have any brands, which you’d recommend? Please share your olive oil hints and tips in the comments below!

25 Reasons You Should Get More Herbs In Your Diet paleo primal health nutrition-min

25 Reasons You Should Get More Herbs In Your Diet

Instead of using herbs just to add flavour and colour to your cooking, do you ever add them for their medicinal benefits? Since ancient times herbs have been used as medicine in cultures all around the world.  Many modern medicines use active ingredients which come directly from plants – so there’s clearly a lot to be gained from plant medicine.

25 Reasons You Should Get More Herbs In Your Diet paleo primal health nutrition-min

Here are 25 herbs that you probably have in your kitchen – and what they are claimed to be beneficial for.

  1. Basil: full of minerals and a natural antioxidant
  2. Black pepper: anti bacterial, antioxidant and helps to stimulates digestion
  3. Cardamom: fresh breath
  4. Cayenne pepper: antibacterial, rich in beta carotene (pre cursor to vitamin A), reduces pain and helps stimulates metabolism
  5. Celery: stimulates the appetite, diuretic, detoxifing, helps with constipation, relieves rheumatism, helps with kidney stones and eases arthritis symptoms
  6. Chili pepper: rich in vitamin C, anti-inflammatory and natural antioxidant
  7. Cinnamon: regulates blood sugar levels, powerful antioxidant, regulates cholesterol metabolism and promotes good circulation
  8. Clove: powerful antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and mildly anesthetic
  9. Coriander: rich in iron and magnesium, prevents gas, prevents urinary infections, regulates blood sugar level and a natural detoxifier of heavy metals
  10. Dill: anti bacterial, antioxidant and contains a lot of iron
  11. Fenugreek: relieves constipation and said to stimulate muscle growth
  12. Ginger: antiseptic, calms the stomach, anti-inflammatory and an effective natural remedy for motion sickness
  13. Ginkgo biloba: stimulates the circulation, anti-aging and improves memory
  14. Garlic: anti bacterial, anti-viral, lowers blood pressure and has natural antibiotic properties
  15. Mint: rich in vitamin C, calms the stomach and intestines and relieves headaches naturally
  16. Mustard seed: rich in selenium, omega-3, phosphorus, vitamin B3 and zinc, helps against cancer and is a natural anti-inflammatory
  17. Nutmeg: anti-inflammatory and helps to regulates sleep
  18. Oregano: anti bacterial, strong antioxidant and useful as preservative
  19. Paprika powder: anti-inflammatory and a natural antioxidant
  20. Parsley: detoxifies, helps with kidney stones and a natural antispasmodic
  21. Pepper: contains a lot of capsaicin (the ingredient that ensure the ‘heat’), clears stuffy noses, relieves pain and said to be beneficial for prostate cancer
  22. Rosemary: keeps the genes young, strengthens the immune system, improves the circulation and stimulates digestion
  23. Sage: improves the memory, anti-inflammatory and a strong natural antioxidant
  24. Thyme: antiseptic and a natural anti bacterial
  25. Turmeric: often called Curcuma, yellow root or curcumine. Very strong antioxidant, is said have a role in cancer prevention, help with skin infections, anti-inflammatory and relieves arthritis symptoms.

Which herbs do you use in your cooking? Have you ever used plants and herbs for health reasons? Was it successful? I’d love to hear your experiences and thoughts in the comments below! And please remember – seek medical advice before using herbs for medicinal purposes!