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Slow Roast Pork with Orange, Sundried Tomatoes and Bay Leaves paleo recipe dinner Sunday lunch primal-min

Recipe: Slow Roast Pork with Orange, Sundried Tomatoes and Bay Leaves

This slow roast pork dish is oh so comforting. Enjoy it as a treat for the whole family every once in a while.

I experimented a little when making this recipe, and browned my pork in the sundried tomato oil rather than normal olive oil. The result was a meat of incredible flavour, and I’m definitely going to cook in ‘infused’ olive oils more often. I’m also going to start making my own, so watch this space!

Slow Roast Pork Ingredients:

  • 750g lean pork shoulder, diced into cubes
  • 400g shallots, peeled and chopped
  • 250ml organic red wine
  • 1 x 400ml can chopped tomatoes
  • 200ml homemade chicken stock / water
  • 2 red peppers (capsicum), deseeded and cut into wedges
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 bay leaves
  • Zest and juice of one orange
  • 100g sundried tomatoes, plus extra oil
  • 50g black olives, pitted
  • 500g peeled sweet potatoes, cut into chunks
  • Salt and pepper
  • A few sprigs of thyme

Slow Roast Pork How To:

Preheat the oven to 150C / 300F / Gas mark 2.

In a pan, heat 1 tbsp of the sundried tomato oil to a high heat. Season the cubes of pork, then fry in 2 separate batches for a couple of minutes until coloured. Transfer to a large bowl and set aside.

Heat another tbsp of the oil, and lightly sauté the shallots, garlic, sundried tomatoes and half of the fresh thyme for 5 minutes. Pour the oil over the pork, and toss well to combine.

Combine the red wine, orange and bay leaves in a large, hob-safe casserole dish. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Return the meat to the dish.

Add the chopped tomatoes, chicken stock, peppers, olives, sweet potatoes and the remaining thyme. Stir well, and cover with a lid. Leave to cook in the oven for 2 ½ – 3 hours, or until the pork is tender enough to cut with a spoon. Spoon off any excess fat before serving (save it to cook with later!)

Slow Roast Pork with Orange, Sundried Tomatoes and Bay Leaves paleo recipe dinner Sunday lunch primal-min

Sausage, Red Wine & Almond Casserole paleo diet recipe-min

Sausage, Red Wine & Almond Casserole Recipe

After a barbecue at the weekend I had some left over cooked sausages that I wanted to make use of. There was also some red wine left over, so I came up with a recipe for a sausage almond & red wine casserole. I used ingredients I already had in the kitchen, so I am sure lots of tweaks could be made.

It made quite a few portions, so I was able to freeze quite a lot, to use for future meals.

Ingredients:

Barbequed Paleo Sausages
2 Red Onions
2 Brown Onions
1 clove garlic
1kg tomatoes
Tomato puree
2 handfuls of raw almonds
1 sprig fresh rosemary
1 glass red wine
Chicken stock
Coconut Oil
Salt & Pepper

Method:

  • I diced the onions and browned them in a pan of coconut oil.
  • I added the crushed garlic, then the chopped tomatoes, tomato purée and the stock. I let the mixture simmer for a few minutes whilst I chopped up the almonds.
  • I added the almonds and wine to the pan, and allowed it to continue simmering for a few minutes, before adding the cut up sausages.
  • I seasoned and added in the rosemary.
  • Once the sausages were thoroughly heated I served up the casserole and left the extra to cool ready for freezing.

I enjoyed the casserole on it’s own, but it would also have gone very well with some cauliflower rice.

Sausage, Red Wine & Almond Casserole paleo diet recipe-min

Is alcohol paleo beer wine allowed alternatives can you drink diet-min

Does Drinking Alcohol Fit With Paleo?

So, yesterday was my Birthday and I had a fabulous time. I hadn’t drunk for a long time, but as it was my Birthday, it seemed only right to have a few drinks at my Halloween party last night! Alcohol and Paleo? Do they mix?

I think there are two main problems with drinking whilst adhering to a Paleo lifestyle. Clearly the ingredients in alcohol are often far from Primal. Alcohol can contain a lot of sugar and gluten in grain based drinks, such as beer. I think the other big issue with drinking is that you may start off with good intentions, but after a few drinks you may become less cautious with drink choice, and more prone to eat un-Paleo food when you inevitably get hungry later on.

Alcohol clearly is not Paleo, and I think it’s a best kept as an occasional treat. There, of course, are times that you want to enjoy a few drinks. At these times, by making good choices along with a degree of planning, you can minimise the damage from a night out.

Before Going Out

  • Think about where you’re going and what you’ll be drinking before you go. This way it will be a lot easier to stick to your plans, instead of trying to work it out at the bar and ending up with a beer in your hand.
  • Are you going to be eating at a Paleo friendly restaurant during the evening? If not, I think it’s very wise to eat just before you go out. Make sure you don’t shy away from fat and protein in your pre-drink meal.
  • Also, I think it’s very wise to prepare some delicious Paleo food for when you get home! If you come in hungry with nothing ready, you might find non-Paleo food a more attractive proposition than you would usually!

At the bar

So, what are the least-bad drink options? And which drinks should you avoid at all costs?

Is alcohol paleo beer wine allowed alternatives can you drink diet-min

BETTER CHOICES

  • Many Paleo people swear by Robb Wolf’s NorCal Margarita. This is made with 100% agave tequila, juice and pulp of a fresh lime, ice and soda water. The tequila is made from fermented agave juice, so it is gluten and starch free. The lime is said to dull the insulin response to the alcohol sugars and provide a net alkaline load in the blood stream. The CO2 from the soda water is said to help the alcohol reach the blood stream sooner, meaning you need to drink less.
  • Other than Tequila, vodka can be a reasonable choice. Look for vodkas distilled from grapes or potatoes.
  • Gin can be an option too, but avoid those distilled from sugar and other grains (look for juniper berries)
  • Red wine has the benefit of containing anti-oxidants; another fair choice. • Cider, especially if you can find a good, organic brand, is a far better choice than beer, though still high in sugar.
  • Generally dry wines and spirits are the best choices in terms of low-carb content, but be careful with those ingredients!

AVOID

  • Beers are generally going to be heavily grain based. Some barley based beers (such as Belgium beers) may be rendered gluten free by secondary fermentation. You can also get gluten free beers, however they are likely to still contain grains, and other undesirable ingredients. Gluten aside, beer is also very carb heavy; another reason to make a different choice.
  • Many drinks are extremely high in sugars. Avoid drinks with fruit juices (these are almost never made with real, fresh fruit juice anyway.
  • Premixed drinks often have very un-Paleo ingredients as well as lots of sugars; avoid!
  • Mixers such as fizzy soft drinks should be avoided as they are full of sugar and all sorts of artificial ingredients. Have your spirits with soda water, or on ice.

Afterwards

When you get home eat some good Paleo food containing good fat and protein and drink water.  Even if it was a late night, try to get up at your usual time the next morning to avoid disrupting your routine for the next few days.

I stuck to vodka, fresh lime and soda water and had a great night. However, I probably won’t drink again for a long time as it doesn’t fit in too well with my Paleo lifestyle!

What are your drinking strategies? Am I missing some good tips? What is your favourite drink? Or perhaps you don’t drink at all?