Paleo recipe dinner On the Side Broccoli with Garlic, Chilli and Cashews-min

Recipe: On the Side Broccoli with Garlic, Chilli and Cashews

As the name suggests, this super quick and healthy broccoli makes a great side dish to just about anything. It's even great to have as a mid afternoon pick me up or an evening snack  – so make sure you make plenty!

If you haven’t used it before, coconut aminos is a great paleo alternative to soy sauce, and for that reason I’ve included it in this recipe to give a real depth of flavour.

Broccoli Ingredients:

  • 500g broccoli
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 red chillies, deseeded and finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 handful cashews
  • Juice of a lime
  • A splash of coconut aminos

Broccoli How To:

1)     In a frying pan, add the garlic, chilli and olive oil and bring to a medium heat. Fry until golden and slightly soft, taking care not to burn,

2)     Cut the broccoli into medium sized florets. Add to the pan along with the cashews, and coat well with the chilli and garlic oil.

3)     Add your coconut aminos, stir, then simmer for 3 – 4 minutes. Finally, add a squeeze of lime, stir again, then serve.

Paleo recipe dinner On the Side Broccoli with Garlic, Chilli and Cashews-min

Paleo recipe Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme-min

Recipe: Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme

Sweet potatoes are a great side dish for a Paleo dinner. Bright orange and packed with vitamins A, B and C, don’t be surprised if you’re wearing sunglasses indoors and singing the alphabet whilst tucking into these!

Roasted Sweet Potato Ingredients:

  • 3 sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into wedges
  • 6 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • Olive oil
  • High grade maple syrup
  • 2 cloves
  • A few sprigs of fresh thyme

Roasted Sweet Potato How To:

1)     Preheat the oven to 180C / 350F / Gas mark 4

2)     Peel and chop the sweet potatoes and carrots. Transfer to a roasting dish. Drizzle over a little olive oil and maple syrup in equal parts, giving the vegetables a light coating.

3)     Throw in the cloves and fresh thyme. Toss the vegetables, then roast for around 40 minutes until well cooked.

Paleo recipe Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme-min

18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet paleo primal vegetables-min

18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet

With most things in life, the key is ‘everything in moderation.’ Not that this means you can eat pizza in moderation, but you get my point. One thing that certainly shouldn't be moderated however is your intake of delicious, fresh veggies. We could all benefit from upping our vegetable intake, and certainly shouldn't be aiming for the paltry ‘5 portions a day’ recommended by so called ‘experts.’ If you’re running out of ways to boost your veggie intake, why not give some of these ideas a try?

18 Ways to Get More Veggies in your Diet paleo primal vegetables-min


Use them in:

Hide them in:

  • Sauces – like this romesco sauce or as a base to a Paleo pizza
  • Baked goods, like these sweet potato and chocolate chip muffins
  • Omelettes – try a spinach and red pepper omelette for a delicious breakfast
  • Dips – why not try replacing the basil with spinach or kale in pesto?
  • Curries – Why not throw some sweet potato, squash, courgette or mushrooms into your curry?
  • Stews / Casseroles – You can ever add some extra veggies like onions, parsnips and carrots and blend them up to make a delicious fresh sauce

Make Paleo Alternatives:

  • Make Paleo Tortillas with Lettuce Wraps
  • Make Paleo Noodles with Courgettes – you may need a spiralizer!
  • Make Paleo Spaghetti with a Spaghetti Squash
  • Make Paleo Rice with Cauliflower

Eat lots of salad!

  • Making your own salad is a great way to consume loads of fresh, colourful veggies in one sitting. You can throw together all sorts of leafy greens, tomatoes, peppers, cucumber, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, avocado – just about anything really!

Snack on them raw

  • Carrots, Cucumber, Celery and Peppers make excellent nibbles at snack time. Spread them with a little almond butter for a little indulgence if you like!

Make a vegetable based broth

  • This is an excellent way to use up all your leftover vegetables – simply throw them all into a pot and cook very gently for a delicious broth!

Go to your farmers market

  • A trip to your local farmers market can make you see vegetables in a whole new light. The colours, shapes and sizes of the produce on offer will be outstanding, and might just reignite your passion for vegetables. An otherwise boring tomato or bunch of kale will probably look much more fun here – so stock up at your local farmers market, and aim to walk away with at least one new vegetable.

How do you get extra veggies in your diet? Are there any ideas I have missed?

40 Top Paleo Recipes - Quick and Easy Paleo Diet Recipes

Why you must wash your pre-washed salad

If you buy a pre-washed ready to eat bag of salad leaves, do you tip straight out onto a plate – or do you thoroughly wash it first? The whole idea of bagged salad mixes is convenience, so it’s no surprise most people don’t wash.

40 Top Paleo Recipes - Quick and Easy Paleo Diet Recipes

But how do they wash the salad before they bag it? Well it turns out diluted chlorine is commonly used. The chlorine is used to kill any harmful bacteria to ensure the lettuce is safe for our consumption. Seemingly even organic produce is allowed to use a weak chlorine solution for this purpose. Whilst there is supposed to be no trace of the chlorine 24 hours after treatment, do you trust your salad to be chemical free?

With outbreaks of e-coli and salmonella, it’s not surprising the salad growers are keen to sanitise their product. With salad available all year round the pressure is on to produce a cheap product – often meaning growers don’t provide sanitary conditions for their workers – hence the contamination risk. Unfortunately sanitising salad doesn’t remove the risk of contamination, it just makes it less likely.

So what’s the answer? If pre-washed salad could still be contaminated and could contain traces of chlorine is it worth paying the price premium?

Wash your own

A far better option is to spend a fraction of the cost buying fresh, unpackaged greens. Get rid of any wilted, torn or bruised leaves and let them sit in a sink full of ice cold water for 20 minutes. Use a salad spinner to get rid of the water and roll in paper towels to get the rest of the water out. If you store in plastic bags with paper towels to absorb any remaining water, they should remain fresh for over a week in the fridge.

How to you wash yours?

Grow your own veggies vegetable patch organic gardening Paleo Network

Why I’m growing my own veggies

Just a few weeks ago I converted the old sand pit that the previous occupants of my house had left behind, to a vegetable patch. Well, when I say converted, I mean mixed some topsoil into the sand. I also re-purposed an old archway they’d left behind into a climbing frame for some green beans.

I put in loads of different seeds to see what would work, and basically forgot about them – until yesterday I saw 28 fully grown beans climbing up the arch! The basil is also working well, but it looks like the spinach I planted has been a bit too much of a hit with the slugs.

Grow your own veggies vegetable patch organic gardening Paleo Network

I’d love to become completely self-sufficient, even if just for vegetables – hopefully with a bit more experimentation I’ll be able to plant more of what works and abandon planting seeds that have no chance in my garden.

Vegetables are surprisingly expensive to buy – and there’s no choice. There are perhaps three varieties of tomatoes, one type of zucchini, two spinach varieties – whereas in the real world there are hundreds of varieties. Take the beans as an example, they’re currently about $5 a kilo at my local supermarket (non-organic). I bought the entire packet of seeds for $1.50 and it looks like I’m going to get quite a big crop.

I also love the idea of being able to pick my dinner off the vine/ plant immediately before cooking it. You really can’t get any fresher than that! Of course, I can also guarantee that my veg hasn’t been sprayed with nasty chemicals, so that’s another huge win. And what can be more satisfying than eating the rewards of your labour!

I’m hoping that since temperatures never really get down to a frost here, I’ll be able to grow something all year round. But failing that hopefully with the aid of my dehydrator, some pickling recipes and my freezer, I should be able to wean off buying my veggies from the supermarket.

Whilst I have got a garden, I’m hardly using any space for my veg – if you’ve just got a balcony, or can squeeze in a window box, you’d be amazed what you can grow – give it a try!

I’d love to hear if you grow your own veggies, and what you’ve had most success with! Any tips would be gratefully received!

Recipe Roast Pork Belly with Garlic Root Vegetable Wedges paleo diet-min

Recipe: Roast Pork Belly with Garlic Root Vegetable Wedges

Who doesn't love pork belly!? It’s such a juicy, flavoursome and indulgent cut of meat. In this recipe, however, the vegetables are the star of the show. The wedges are everything they should be; crisp on the outside, soft and gooey in the middle, and seasoned to perfection. The beauty of using three different root vegetables is the contrast in flavours you get – no two wedges are the same!

Recipe: Roast Pork Belly with Garlic Root Vegetable Wedges
Recipe type: Dinner
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
  • 1.25kg organic pork belly
  • 1 tbsp lard
  • Sea Salt
  • Cracked Black Pepper
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes
  • 1 swede
  • 4 medium parsnips
  • 2 tbsp ghee / coconut oil (melted)
  • Sea salt
  • Cracked Black Pepper
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  1. Preheat your oven to 240C / 475F. Score the pork belly across the skin with a sharp knife, and then massage in the lard. Season well with salt, pepper and garlic powder.
  2. Place the meat skin side up in a large roasting dish. Place on the top shelf of the oven for 15 minutes, until the skin starts to bubble and is golden brown. At this point, lower the heat to 180C / 350F, and set the timer for an hour and a quarter.
  3. Peel the vegetables, and remove the core from the parsnips. Chop into wedges about 2cm thick – and don’t be afraid to leave jagged edges, as these will go lovely and crispy. Arrange them all in a roasting dish, and toss in the melted ghee / coconut oil. Season well with the salt, pepper and garlic powder, and transfer to the bottom shelf of the oven when there are 40 minutes left on the timer. Toss once or twice during the cooking time.
  4. When the time is up, remove the pork from the oven and leave to rest for 10 minutes. Carve the meat, and remove the wedges from the oven to serve alongside.

Recipe Roast Pork Belly with Garlic Root Vegetable Wedges paleo diet-min

Clean and Green Vegetable Juice smoothie healthy paleo recipe primal-min

Recipe: Clean and Green Vegetable Juice

No matter how healthy a lifestyle we may lead, sometimes every day pressures can catch up on us and leave us feeling a little run down. Get yourself back on track with this vibrant, nutrient dense green vegetable juice.

I invested in a juicer about two years ago, and its one of the best purchases I have ever made for my kitchen. If you don’t have one, try whizzing this up in a high powered blender. You’ll get a little froth on top, but the health benefits will all be there.

Green Vegetable Juice Ingredient:

(enough for 2 large glasses)

  • 2 cucumbers
  • 4 tightly packed cups of spinach
  • 10 kale leaves
  • 4 inch piece of ginger
  • Juice 2 lemons

Green Vegetable Juice How To:

Juice all the ingredients on full power, bar the lemon.

When done, stir in the lemon juice and serve immediately!

Clean and Green Vegetable Juice smoothie healthy paleo recipe primal-min

Why You Should Add More Sulphurous Veggies To Your Diet Dr Tery Wahls paleo diet primal-min

Why You Should Add More Sulphurous Veggies To Your Diet

I hadn't given much thought to sulphurous veggies, until reading about the Dr. Terry Wahls protocol. Dr Terry Wahls reversed her multiple sclerosis in part, by modifying her diet. She recommends eating 3 cups of leafy greens, 3 cups of antioxidants and 3 cups of sulfurous veggies every day.

What’s so special about sulfur and why should we eat more?

It might smells like rotten eggs, but sulphur is found all throughout our body in the connective tissues such as nerve cells, skin, hair and nails. It’s therefore essential that we can replenish the sulphur in our bodies – and what better way than eating sulfurous veggies?

So which vegetables are good sources of sulphur?


Broccoli is the top vegetable in the list of sulphurous vegetables. This cabbage is rich in the sulfur glucoraphanin. As soon as broccoli is chewed on or cut, the glucoraphanin is transformed into sulforaphane.

Other cabbages

Like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, red cabbage and all the other forms of cabbage, are sulfurous vegetables. They contain organic sulphurous substances and are packed with vitamins.

Vitamin U, or cabagin, can be found in cabbages too, another reason to eat more cabbage. Cabbages are also rich in indoles, which help regulate estrogen metabolism. What is there not to love?!

Why You Should Add More Sulphurous Veggies To Your Diet Dr Tery Wahls paleo diet primal-min


Garlic is probably the most used medicinal plant in history. Garlic works as an anticoagulant, which decreases the silting of platelets and inhibits the formation of blood clots.

Garlic also helps the immune system. The different sulfur compounds have antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic and antifungal properties.


As well as being a great source of sulphur, asparagus is rich in glutathione.

Other Sulphurous Vegetables

Chicory, endive and onions are also good sources of sulfur.

How to eat more sulfurous veggies?

You can eat these vegetable raw of cooked, so try adding to salads, or using for a green smoothie. Keep you fridge stocked with prepared veggies, to make it easy to add them to your meals.

How much do sulphurous veggies play a role in your diet? Have you tried the Dr Terry Wahls protocol? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Recipe: Sauteed Turmeric Sweet Potatoes

Earthy and wholesome, these sweet potatoes make a lovely side dish to chicken, pork or lamb. Add red and green capsicum (bell peppers) for a real explosion of colour!

Sautéed Sweet Potato Ingredients:

  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced into 1cm cubes
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2cm knob of ginger, chopped
  • Coconut Oil
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • A pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Juice of ½ lemon

Sautéed Sweet Potato How To:

1)     Heat a pan to a medium heat with a little coconut oil.

2)     In a bowl, combine the onions and sweet potatoes with the lemon, turmeric and cayenne. Add the garlic and ginger and mix together.

3)     Fry for about 10 minutes, until the potatoes are nice and crispy.

Don’t forget to share in the comments what you enjoyed them with!

Recipe paleo Sauteed Turmeric Sweet Potatoes-min

paleo recipe Griddled Asparagus with Pine Nuts-min

Recipe: Griddled Asparagus with Pine Nuts

An easy and effective way to make awesome asparagus! This is a great side dish with any dinner. It's easy to over cook – but take care because well cooked asparagus makes such a difference!


  • 500g asparagus spears
  • A handful of fresh parsley
  • A handful of fresh tarragon
  • A handful of pine nuts
  • Olive oil
  • Sea Salt
  • Black Pepper

Asparagus How To:

1)     Sear the asparagus on a griddle at a medium low heat. You don’t need any oil, as this way they will crisp up far more.

2)     While these are cooking, finely chop the herbs, and mix together with 2tbsp olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper.

3)     Remove the asparagus from the heat when it is suitably chargrilled, normally after 7 – 8 minutes. Drizzle with the herb oil, then scatter the pine nuts.

I’d love to hear how you cook and prepare your veggies.

paleo recipe Griddled Asparagus with Pine Nuts-min