Sticky BBQ Chicken Wings paleo diet primal recipe barbecue-min

Recipe: Sticky BBQ Chicken Wings

What more is there to say!? Hands down the perfect Friday night treat, these chicken wings are brilliant with a healthy green salad.

Sticky BBQ Chicken Wings Ingredients:

  • 16 free range chicken wings
  • 2 tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp tomato puree
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • ½ tsp mustard powder
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper

Sticky BBQ Chicken Wings How To:

1)     Preheat an oven to 200C / 400F / Gas mark 5. Place the chicken wings in a roasting dish, season with salt and pepper, then bake for 15 minutes.

2)     Meanwhile, combine all the sauce ingredients in a bowl, mixing really well.

3)     Remove the chicken wings from the oven. Lower the heat to 180 / 350F / Gas mark 4. Baste the wings in the sauce mixture before returning to the oven. Bake for a further 25 minutes, turning every so often and coating them in the juices.

Sticky BBQ Chicken Wings paleo diet primal recipe barbecue-min

Paleo recipe Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme-min

Recipe: Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme

Sweet potatoes are a great side dish for a Paleo dinner. Bright orange and packed with vitamins A, B and C, don’t be surprised if you’re wearing sunglasses indoors and singing the alphabet whilst tucking into these!

Roasted Sweet Potato Ingredients:

  • 3 sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into wedges
  • 6 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • Olive oil
  • High grade maple syrup
  • 2 cloves
  • A few sprigs of fresh thyme

Roasted Sweet Potato How To:

1)     Preheat the oven to 180C / 350F / Gas mark 4

2)     Peel and chop the sweet potatoes and carrots. Transfer to a roasting dish. Drizzle over a little olive oil and maple syrup in equal parts, giving the vegetables a light coating.

3)     Throw in the cloves and fresh thyme. Toss the vegetables, then roast for around 40 minutes until well cooked.

Paleo recipe Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Carrots and Fresh Thyme-min

Raw Chocolate Maple and Pecan Fudge recipe paleo primal sugar free sweet streats dessert-min

Recipe: Raw Chocolate Maple and Pecan Fudge

Makes roughly 20 squares
The classic combination of Maple and Pecan tastes like heaven in this silky smooth raw chocolate fudge. I added Lucuma for a touch extra sweetness and to ramp up the levels of iron and calcium, but its not essential.

Raw Chocolate Maple and Pecan Fudge Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pecans, roughly chopped
  • ½ cup pecan butter (best when home made!)
  • ½ cup coconut butter
  • ½ cup raw cacao powder
  • 100ml maple syrup (adjust to taste)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp lucuma powder (optional)

Raw Chocolate Maple and Pecan Fudge Ingredients:

1) With a fork, combine the pecan butter and coconut butter. If you don’t have coconut butter available, I guess coconut oil would work just as well, however you may want to use a little less.

2) Whisk in the cacao powder until smooth. Add the maple syrup, vanilla, and lucuma if using, and whisk well until thoroughly combined. Stir in the chopped pecans.

3) Line a baking tray with some parchment paper. Pour the mixture out evenly, then transfer to the freezer for an hour or so. When completely set, remove, leave for 10 minutes at room temperature, then fall in love.

Raw Chocolate Maple and Pecan Fudge recipe paleo primal sugar free sweet streats dessert-min

Maple and Cayenne Roasted Almonds paleo recipe snack-min

Recipe: Maple and Cayenne Roasted Almonds

A recipe I came up with when I had more almonds than I knew what to do with; a little bit of maple syrup goes a long way to making these roasted almonds taste like a real treat. To adjust sweetness for your own palette, simply alter the ratio of maple syrup to olive oil. If you want more spice, don’t be afraid to go for it with the cayenne!

Roasted Almonds Ingredients:

  • 250grams raw almonds
  • 3 tbsp high grade maple syrup
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • ½ tsp sea salt

Roasted Almonds How To:

Preheat the oven to 180C / 350F / Gas mark 4. Line a large baking tray with some parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix together all the ingredients for the coating. Add the almonds, and coat evenly in the mixture. Lay them out on the baking tray, making sure they are evenly spread out. You may need to cook in two separate batches.

Roast in the oven for 5 – 6 minutes, give them a shake, then return to the oven for a further 5 – 6 minutes. Remove when golden brown.

So tell me, what are your favourite nuts to roast?

Maple and Cayenne Roasted Almonds paleo recipe snack-min

Paleo Diet Recipe Primal Raw Chocolate Caramel Torte dessert sweet treat pudding cake 680 min

Recipe: Raw Chocolate Caramel Torte

Delightfully decadent chocolate cream, layered on top of rich caramel and a crisp, buttery biscuit base in a beautiful torte. Sound like the kind of thing you can only eat in your wildest, non-paleo dreams? Think again! The power of almonds, avocado, cacao and coconut make this treat as good for your body as it is for your soul.

I used maple syrup as my sweetener in this recipe, but I’m sure raw honey will work just as well!

Raw Chocolate Caramel Torte Ingredients:

For the base:

  • 1 cup ground almonds
  • 1 cup unsweetened, finely shredded coconut
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 medjool dates, pitted
  • 1 tbsp raw honey / maple syrup

For the caramel:

  • 50g almond butter
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 medjool dates
  • 2 tbsp raw honey / maple syrup
  • A dash of almond milk
  • A little vanilla extract and sea salt (optional)

For the chocolate:

  • 1 avocado, skinned and pitted
  • ¼ cup raw cacao powder
  • ¼ cup raw honey / maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 handful cacao nibs (optional)

Raw Chocolate Caramel Torte How To:

Line a 6 inch round cake tin with some baking parchment.

To make the base, combine the ground almonds with the coconut in the food processor. Add the coconut oil, dates and maple syrup, and whizz together until combined. Press the mixture into the cake tin, and put straight into the freezer for 10 minutes to set.

Meanwhile, make the caramel by combining almond butter, coconut oil, dates, honey, vanilla and sea salt. Whizz together in the food processor until a smooth, thick paste is formed. Gradually add a little dash of almond milk to thin down to your desired caramel consistency (I used about 2tbsp). Spread evenly over the biscuit base, then return to the freezer for another 10 minutes.

Make the chocolate topping by combining all ingredients in the food processor. Smooth evenly over the caramel, top with cacao nibs if using, then leave to set in the fridge for an hour (if you can wait that long!)

Paleo Diet Recipe Primal Raw Chocolate Caramel Torte dessert sweet treat pudding cake 680 min

The Definitive Guide to Paleo Sweeteners sugar stevia healthy agave-min

The Definitive Guide to Paleo Sweeteners

Whenever I write about sugar, I get a lot of spam comments trying to advertise brands of “natural, healthy” sweeteners that, apparently, are simply bursting with healthiness. I’m also constantly aware of people choosing artificial sweeteners to avoid sugar; as well as people choosing “natural” sweeteners over artificial, or just regular sugar.

So what is the difference between all of these types and brands of sweeteners? Are there really new natural sweeteners out there, or is it just clever marketing of an existing product, with a new brand name?

The Definitive Guide to Paleo Sweeteners sugar stevia healthy agave-min


Natural Sweeteners

A natural sweetener, by definition is one that is unprocessed, and naturally occurring in nature – in the same state (or requiring minimal processing that you could do yourself). A lot of sweeteners sold as natural, actually require a lot of refining and processing to get to the state they reach us in – far from natural.


One of the most talked about sweeteners, Stevia is actually a herb. It has a natural sweet taste, but no actual sugar molecules. The green leaf Stevia plant is therefore a great alternative to sugar. Unfortunately, far more readily available than the green leaf versions, is the white powdered form of Stevia (i.e. branded as Natvia, Truvia or Sun Crystals). This is very processed, and definitely one to be avoided.


Raw Honey is a great natural sweetener. Using a local honey is even supposed to reduce hayfever. Whilst honey is natural (and in fact the only sweetener I use), it still produces an insulin effect and is definitely best suited for occasional use – as are all forms of sweeteners.

Maple Syrup, traditionally made Agave Nectar (Miel de Agave), Sorghum Syrup, Coconut Sugar, Palm Sugar, Molasses, Date Sugar, Cane Sugar, Fruit Juice, Muscovado and Sucanat are also natural sugars – but, again, no sweetener is the healthier choice, even if they are natural! Incidentally you might have seen Brown Rice Syrup in you health food shop – and whilst it too is “natural”, it contains malt and is therefore a source of gluten!

Not So Natural?

Agave Nectar is another one that seems to be thought of as another supremely healthy product. Agave is natural, in that it comes from the juice of the agave plant. It has a low glycemic profile, which means less of an insulin spike. However, this is because Agave nectar contains only 10% glucose – which means the other 90% is fructose, which comes with all sorts of health issues and is definitely to be avoided. Not only should Agave be avoided for its high fructose concentration, but it also contains saponins; toxins that have less than desirable effects on the body. Agave Nectar is produced in a not too dissimilar way to High Fructose Corn Syrup – yet at least HFCS is seldom marketed as a healthy sweetener.

Turbinado Sugar and Sugar Alcohols (i.e. xylitol and erythritol) are also not natural; but often sold with impressive health claims.

Artificial Sweeteners

The chemical sweeteners really are a no brainer. Recognised as toxins in the body – and in many cases not established enough for us to really understand their impact, I can’t see any reason why anyone would want to consume these. There is also a lot of research into the insulin response, with many suggesting that the sweet taste, even in the absence of sugar, is enough to trigger an insulin response.

Artificial sweeteners include Aspartame (sold as NutraSweet or Equal), Saccharin (Sweet n Low), Sucralose (Splenda), Acesulfame-K (Sunette or Sweet One), Sorbitol, Mannitol and Tagatose.

Sweeteners – Are They Paleo?

Whilst the natural sweeteners are without doubt less harmful than their chemical or processed alternatives, they still aren’t “Paleo”. As an occasional treat Raw Honey is the only sweetener I would suggest.

Ultimately, it’s best to give up the need for constant sweetness. Since doing so, I’ve found my taste buds have changed and I no longer crave sweet things like I used to. Try giving up sugar; after a few weeks you’ll be glad you did!

Have you given up sugar? If not, what types of sweeteners do you use?