80 paleo breakfast ideas primal diet network suggestions recipes-min

80 Paleo Breakfast Ideas

If it wasn’t for struggling to come up with different Paleo Breakfast Ideas, I’m sure more people would make the transition over to Paleo. Unfortunately, Breakfast seems to be associated with cereal, toast, bagels, crumpets and sugar laden foods.

Breakfast doesn’t have to equal grains! tweet this quote

I think a lot of people also get stuck in a breakfast rut making the same dish every day. Well, it’s time to break it up – try something new for breakfast tomorrow!

My biggest tip is to get used to seeing breakfast as fuel – it’s just another meal! And who wants to start the day off with a big sugar crash?

80 paleo breakfast ideas primal diet network suggestions recipes-min

I’ve come up with lots of great Paleo Breakfast Ideas for whatever your Paleo situation (no time, dislike eggs, want to drink breakfast, child friendly, SAD substitutes, vegetarian/ vegan or keen to impress) – there are certainly lots of options.

To prove the point, here is a HUGE list of 80 Paleo Breakfast Ideas to inspire you. And if you want even MORE, check out my very own Paleo Breakfast Recipe book, with over 100 pages of beautifully photographed step-by-step recipes.

Easy Paleo Breakfast Ideas

Here are some Paleo Breakfast Ideas for when you have a little bit of time in the morning:

1. Bacon, eggs, avocado, mushrooms & tomato

2. An omelette with your choice of meat, vegetables and of course – egg yolks as well as whites

3. Make a frittata with your favourite veggies, meats and cheese (if you’re more Primal than Paleo)

4. There’s nothing like steak and eggs for breakfast!

5. For a nutritionally dense Paleo Breakfast Idea, chop up chicken liver and scramble with eggs, mushroom, onions and capsicum (bell peppers)

6. Scrambled eggs mixed with diced bacon and avocado (my personal favourite!)

7. Soft boiled eggs and wilted spinach

8. Lots of nations wake up to soup – make a soup with bone broth – or try coconut milk and leftover meat and veggies

9. Sweet potato, sardines and a poached egg

10. Try substitution bacon for skirt steak and serve with pumpkin

11. Bake an egg in an avocado

12. Bone broth with an egg whisked in

13. Smoked salmon and fried eggs for a great protein boast

14. Smoked haddock with poached eggs and wilted spinach

No Time?

When you need a good, quick Paleo Breakfast and have no time to cook and prepare, here are some fast ideas:

15. Paleo Breakfast Casserole – the night before put your choice of ingredients in your slow cooker – and wake up to an instant hot breakfast

16. Egg muffins – cook these up with your favourite veggies and meat in a big batch – and help yourself from the fridge all week

17. Make up a batch of salmon and zucchini croquettes to dig into all week

18. Black Coffee

19. Got a couple of minutes? Scramble an egg in a mug in the microwave

20. The day before, roast some sweet potatoes, and some chicken and have waiting in a container ready for breakfast

21. Make up a breakfast salad the night before with nuts, olives, avocado – and dress with extra virgin olive oil to serve

Grab & Go/ Travel

With no time to eat at home, these are some Paleo Breakfast ideas you can have on the go, eat on the road or perhaps at work.

22. Take a can of tuna/ mackerel/ kippers/ sardines and some pre-cut raw veggies

23. Make a Paleo trail mix with your favourite nuts and dried fruit

24. There’s nothing wrong with beef jerky for breakfast!

25. Hard boiled eggs travel well and can be prepared in advance

26. Make a BLT sandwich using capsicum (bell pepper) as the “bread”

27. Coconut yoghurt

28. Take a halved avocado and a spoon

29. Pork scratchings/ crackling/ rind (whatever you like to call it!)

30. Make up nut balls with nuts, seeds, spices and coconut oil and store in the fridge

SAD Substitutes

If you’re missing your old SAD breakfasts, there’s a Paleo Diet grain-free equivalent for almost everything…

31. Make a Paleo cereal with your favourite nuts, berries and seeds in a bowls of almond milk

32. Or try a Paleo cereal using dried fruit, seeds and nuts and serve with coconut milk and a pinch of cinnamon

33. Paleo granola can be made up from your choice of nuts and served with coconut milk

34. Make up banana bread with almond meal – and bananas!

35. A coconut muesli with nuts, seeds and coconut flakes served in coconut milk

36. Make up a noatmeal – or a Paleo porridge substitute using ground nuts, seeds, eggs and coconut milk

The Paleo Recipe Book

Leftovers

These deserve their own category! Make sure you cook up extra dinner the night before – and you have a ready made breakfast. What’s wrong with steak for breakfast? tweet this quote

37. Sauté onions and mushrooms – and last nights leftover meat and serve over poached eggs

Something Fancy

If you have the time, there are some great Paleo Breakfast Ideas that are perfect for an occasional treat. I very rarely use nuts and nut flours, but they are great for special occasions – and especially good for showing your SAD friends just what is possible when you go grain-free:

38. Paleo pancakes with almond meal take a bit more time, but are well worth the effort

39. Or try sweet potato pancakes

40. Waffles can be made with coconut flour or almond meal and served with a berry sauce

41. A Paleo NoOatmeal is far better than the SAD equivalent and can be prepared the night before, and cooked up in the morning

42. Raspberry Crepes made with coconut flour or almond meal served with fresh raspberries & whipped coconut cream – and a pinch of cinnamon

43. Scotch eggs; coat hard-boiled eggs in Paleo Sausage mixture, cover in almond meal and baked – amazing with poached eggs

44. A Paleo platter with a selection of fruits, cold meats, pickles, olives, sun-dried tomatoes & blanched veggies

45. Make bacon baskets using a cake case as a mould and bake eggs in them

46. My salmon burgers

47. Stuff capsicum (bell peppers) with salmon, mushroom and tomato and top with pine nuts

48. Sliced onion wrapped with smoked salmon on a bed of lettuce

49. Your favourite seafood & veggies

50. Serve scrambled eggs in an orange half

No Eggs!

It’s easy to make every Paleo Breakfast include eggs – and it can be easy to get fed up of eggs! Here are some egg free Paleo Breakfast Ideas:

51. Kippers and dried figs

52. Paleo Sausages and kimchi

53. Pan fried zuchinni served with guacamole

54. Stuffed portabello mushrooms

55. Sautéed minced (ground) beef, greens, onions and carrots

56. Sausages with sauerkraut & stir fried veggies

57. Trout with mushrooms and tomato

58. Fry kidneys and serve with broccoli

all without eggs!

Intermittent Fasting for Breakfast?

Since I’ve been Paleo, I quite often skip breakfast altogether – have you tried skipping breakfast?

Eat Stop Eat

Paleo Breakfasts For Kids (and big Kids alike!)

If your family has recently gone Paleo, here are a few suggestions your children and toddlers will love!

59. Egg & roasted vegetable soldiers

60. Make berry muffins with eggs, coconut flour, nuts and berries

61. Raw or blanched veggies served with nut butter, guacamole and salsa dips

Paleo Vegetarian/ Vegan Options

If you still can’t face meat in the morning, how about these ideas? Or you could always try a smoothie!

62. Poached eggs and sweet potato (or even yam) hash browns

63. Sauté some greens, squeeze on some lemon and add an egg

64. Fry eggs in a capsicum (bell pepper) ring or onion ring

65. Steamed broccoli with sweet potatoes

66. Mash up a hard-boiled egg with avocado

67. Try scrambling eggs with mushrooms, onions and a home-made tomato salsa

Fruit Friendly?

It’s common to minimise fruit intake on a Paleo Diet, due to it’s high fructose content. If you’re targeting weight loss, it can be a good idea to minimise fruit and nuts. However, if you’re all for fruit, here are some fruity Paleo Breakfast Ideas. Remember berries have a lower fructose content and are loaded with antioxidants.

68. A nice simple fruit salad – served with whipped coconut cream

69. Even easier – a piece of fruit and a few berries

70. Make a warm fruit custard with eggs & coconut milk on the stove, nutmeg, cinnamon, berries a banana and some nuts

71. Chop up a kiwi fruit in coconut cream (or heavy cream if you do dairy too)

72. Wrap cubes of melon in prosciutto

Primal Breakfast Ideas

If your diet is more Primal than Paleo and you include some dairy, here are a few Primal Breakfast ideas for you.

73. Greek yoghurt with nuts, berries and your favourite spices

74. Apple and cheese is a winning combination!

75. Try the paleo cereal suggestions in raw milk instead of coconut

76. Bacon and tomato wrapped in cheese and lettuce wraps

Drinkable Breakfasts

A nice alternative – or something hand to have on the go is a smoothie or shake. There are some good options. Make sure you add in fat, perhaps an avocado or some coconut oil and enjoy your breakfast drink!

77. Green smoothies; try adding in Kale and spinach for a vitamin boast

78. Make an anti-oxidant berry smoothie with coconut milk

79. A veggie juice with coconut milk, carrots, broccoli and celery

80. A banana smoothie made with frozen bananas , coconut milk and almond butter

I hope I’ve given you some inspiration! If you’re after even more, please check out my very own recipe book, the Paleo Breakfast Recipe Book with a recipe to suit every single paleo breakfast situation! I’d love to hear your favourite Paleo Breakfast Ideas in the comments below! What’s on your menu?

The Slow Paleo Transition primal diet-min

The Slow Paleo Transition

A lot of people seem to prefer to jump straight into Paleo. To clean out the kitchen, buy new cookbooks and go cold turkey on the grains all on the same day.

For others however, jumping straight in is a scary prospect. After eating a certain way for an entire lifetime, a slow, gradual transition into Paleo is the favoured approach for many. So how do you make a slow transition?

There are lots of plans that I think lead very gently into a Paleo diet, making it much easier to become “fully Paleo” without any fuss or issue. A lot of people who used to rely on refined grains, find suddenly cutting off those carbs can result in “carb flu”. This can last for a couple of weeks, and is not an enjoyable experience – but well worth persevering with to come out the other side, feeling like a new person.

Research and Reading

I always think the best start to a new routine is research. Understand exactly what you’re doing and why. Read everything you can Paleo from blogs, ebooks and books such as Mark Sisson’s Primal Blueprint and Robb Wolf’s The Paleo Solution.

Replace Industrial Oils

A quick win is to replace industrial seed oils with coconut oil and olive oil. You won’t feel your missing out on anything by throwing away the canola, sunflower, soybean, vegetable oil and margarine – but your body will thank you for it!

Quit Sugar

Giving up sugar is a great next step. Until you do this, you probably won’t realise how much sugar you actually eat. Ebooks like the Balance Bites “21 Day Sugar Detox” and Sarah Wilsons “I Quit Sugar” make the process easier, by taking you through this step by step.

Weston A Price

Once seed oils and sugar are in hand, I think adopting a Weston A Price approach would be an easy transition. This will enable you to focus on the quality of the food you eat. You don’t have to give up grains – yet – but you will be preparing them the minimise the harmful effects. You’ll still be consuming dairy, but you’ll be careful to ensure it’s good quality, raw dairy, which will be a significant bonus to your health.

Primal BluePrint

Once you become used to Weston A Price, it’s time to let go of the grains and address the rest of your lifestyle. Mark Sisson’s Primal BluePrint plan is the perfect next step. You’ll get rid of the grains, but keep the dairy. You’ll see the importance of the rest of your life and start sprinting and lifting heavy things. You’ll see the importance of sunshine, reducing stress and sleeping well. You’ll understand that there will be occasions you don’t make good food choices, but with the 80:20 rule, that’s ok – you’re getting it right far more often than not.

Whole30

One the Primal diet is dialled in, it’s time to go fully Paleo. I think the Whole30 is the best way to start this – and having been Primal, all you’re going to give up is dairy; not a big ask at all. A dedicated 30 days will enable you to see the benefits of eating this way and start to develop habits and routines.

Fully Paleo

After the Whole30, you can assess how you feel and slowly start to reintroduce foods (if you feel you really missed dairy, for example).

With a slow transition, you should be able to go from a SAD to a Paleo diet, without any real hardship or difficulty.

What was (or will be, for those just learning about Paleo!) your approach? Are you black or white, or do you prefer a slow transition? Did I miss any steps in a gradual transition?

The Slow Paleo Transition primal diet-min

Paleo or primal diet what's the difference-min

A Primal Diet, Or a Paleo Diet?

This way of eating, this lifestyle, is given so many names. You might follow a Paleo Diet or a Primal Diet – or perhaps you eat an Ancestral Diet or eat like a Caveman?

Does it matter what it’s called? And do the different terms even refer to the same way of eating?

Paleo Diet

The term “Paleo Diet” was coined by Loren Cordain and originally had a far less liberal stance on Saturated Fats. He has now updated his books on this and on the use of sweeteners, to the popular “Paleo Diet” followed by many today. Robb Wolf has also played a significant role in popularising the Paleo Diet as it is today.

As well as avoiding grains and legumes, Paleo also avoids dairy. In the Paleo community strict adherence to a Paleo diet is recommended for at least 30 days. After this period foods can slowly be re-introduced and any impact assessed to determine which foods have a detrimental effect and should be avoided in the future.

Primal Diet

The Primal BluePrint way of eating is from the book, written by Mark Sisson – and is much more than just nutrition. The plan places as much importance on movement, lifting heavy things, reducing stress, sleeping properly and getting some sunshine as it does on nutrition. Nutritionally Primal is very similar to Paleo in the avoidance of grains and legumes; dairy is where they differ. A Primal way of eating includes dairy – though it is recommended that it is raw dairy; from grass-fed Ruminants, un-pasturised and ideally fermented. Lacto-Paleo is another term used to describe eating a Paleo style diet, but with the inclusion of dairy.

The jury is still very much out on dairy. The growth hormones such as IGF-1 and the insulin response are behind the refusal of many, to include dairy in their diets. A lot of people find they don’t tolerate dairy well, which is reason enough to avoid it!

Paleo or primal diet what's the difference-min

Ancestral Diet

This term can apply to any form of Paleo, but I hear this term used more amongst the scientific/ research pockets of the community.

Caveman Diet

This is the term almost exclusively used by the mainstream media when talking about any type of eating that touches on Paleo. The term “Caveman Diet” is usually accompanied by photos of cavemen, Fred Flintstone or semi-naked people eating raw meat! When people talk about a Caveman Diet, they seem to assume it’s required to act like a caveman too and don’t realise it’s about science, not re-enacting cavemen! I would never refer to a Paleo or Primal way of eating in this way, but ultimately if it raises awareness amongst more people, I guess it doesn’t matter what it’s called!

There are a lot of descriptions of ways of eating that have similarities to Paleo. I think a gluten-free diet could come close (though I think many people avoid gluten, but replace it with other undesirable refined grains and processed foods). The Atkins diet is also commonly assumed to be Paleo – and whilst there are similarities, it’s very possibly to follow Atkins eating nothing but junk food; not Paleo! A Weston A Price way of eating also has many similarities.

How do you describe how you eat? Do you avoid using labels like “the Paleo diet” or “the Primal diet”?

PrimalCon

PrimalCon 2012

After a 14-hour flight, five movies, no sleep and more intermittent fasting than planned (more on that in a future post) – I made it back to Sydney from PrimalCon yesterday, exhausted – but very inspired!

This was my second year at PrimalCon, so I had a better idea of what to expect this year – and even some wonderful friends from last year I was excited to see again.

Last year was my first time in California, so I assumed it was always hot and sunny there. Packing with that assumption was a big mistake! The weather completely changed on Friday, the first full day of PrimalCon, so much so that the day’s activities were moved inside – thank goodness! I must make sure I bring some warmer clothes next year, just in case.

When I first arrived at the resort, I noticed a few people in minimalist footwear who I knew must be there for PrimalCon – and people drinking energy drinks who I knew I could safely guarantee weren’t there for the same reasons!

The PrimalCon Experts

I finally got to meet Primal Girl, Tara Grant in person at registration. We’d been in contact over email, but it’s definitely no substitute for meeting in real life. Tara was there for the whole weekend answering questions, telling her own story and giving ideas to the participants. She really is such an inspiration and looks the image of health!

Last year Barefoot Ted’s session was my introduction to barefoot running. Since then I’ve been wearing Vibrams regularly, so I learnt so much more from him this year. Ted is a great storyteller and teacher. During a break in the rain we went outside for his class. Predictably as soon as we got to the furthest point, the storm came back with a vengeance, giving us even more incentive to put what we’d learnt into practice to sprint back to the hotel as quickly as possible!

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The sprint clinic with Olympian Michael Stember dovetailed perfectly with the barefoot running class, I’m really looking forward to putting everything I’ve learnt into practice and trying to make my running style look and feel as effortless as both Michael and Barefoot Ted’s.

 

William Vives is a regular at PrimalCon and an expert on kettlebells and fitness and took his session in a corridor of the hotel (the rain was that heavy!) focusing on getting the techniques right. This was a great session as it’s all too easy to get distracted by speed and number of reps – and letting form suffer. I’ve been using kettlebells for a while, but learnt so much that was completely new to me in William’s class. William gave me so many fantastic tips and advice which I’m so grateful for – I feel like he’s helped to bring my fitness goals a lot closer. If only we had a William Vives in Australia!

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One of the sessions I’d been looking forward to the most was Erwan Le Corre, founder of MovNat. I’d heard him speak at the AHS 2011, but his brand of teaching needs to be on the move, not behind a lectern. Unfortunately my group was the first; we were hoping for a break in the weather, but it just got worse and worse. In true Primal style, we persevered, crawling, jumping and lying on the ground. Despite the weather, it was enough to convince me to sign up for one of his 7-day courses – once I master pull-ups (Erwan says this isn’t essential, but I want to get the maximum benefit from his class). Other than the class it was fascinating watching Erwan over the weekend. He never seemed to sit – even at lunch he ate his lunch from a grok squat on his chair. He also seems to look at the world in an entirely different way – I could see him studying the ground and objects, working out how he could get across/ over/ under/ along different surfaces. He really does live and breathe MovNat!

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Mark Sisson took a couple of sessions talking and answering all sorts of different questions. It’s really interesting to hear which topics are hot issues at the moment. Predictably Cold Thermogenesis was of interest, as Jack Kruse has recently brought to the attention of the Paleo community. Ketosis was another issue that was asked about in various guises.

Kelly Starrett was new this year and was such a pleasure to listen to – he spoke about mobility, which is so important, yet really overlooked. I’d planned to catch up with him later to find out more, but got sidetracked with all of the other things that were going on.

I’d barely even noticed Vanessa and Adam Lambert on the schedule with Olympic Lifting. This was one of the choice sessions and I was delighted to have a one-on-one session with Adam. I’ve been interested in Olympic Lifting for a while, but had never actually tried it before. It was amazing, my favourite session of the weekend! I went from being really unsure of the strange movements, to some great lifting. I want more of this! Vanessa used to train with Robb Wolf and was giving some incredible gymnastics lessons and demonstrations. Perhaps at next year’s PrimalCon I’ll give that more of a try.

Chef Rachel Albert was also back from last year, only this year her Paleo cookery demonstration was from a beach house. I’d learnt so much last year, so had high expectations this time – and she didn’t disappoint. Her demonstration was full of so many tips, often really simple ideas, but things I’d just never thought of doing before! It’s great to have a chef championing Paleo cooking at PrimalCon

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As you’d expect from PrimalCon, the food was absolutely amazing. I find it so hard to get Turkey and Kale in Australia, so made the most of their abundance! On the first evening we were served a soup and my first thought was that I would obviously have to leave it – then I remembered where I was! It’s such a wonderfully refreshing change knowing that all of the food was 100% Primal, not a grain or legume in sight – and certainly nothing processed.

It’s funny meeting so many people with the same beliefs on nutrition; you’d think all of the conversation would be about being Paleo, but it’s not at all. You already know you have that common basis and so much else to discuss. There were quite a few of us from overseas this year, including a few from Europe and the UK and even another Sydneysider – who’d have thought!

I’ve come away from PrimalCon feeling inspired with new friends and so many new tips and ideas I’m itching to put into practice. I hope to see more of you there again next year, for PrimalCon 2013!

Is milk paleo dairy primal lacto cheese-min

Dairy and Paleo

Dairy is one Paleo area I’ve been thinking about a lot recently.  A lot of people follow a strict Paleo diet, and include dairy, known as a lacto-Paleo diet.  Dairy is also the main difference between a Primal and a Paleo diet (Primal includes modest amounts of high quality dairy).

Prior to my trip to the AHS in August, my diet was a lot closer to Primal than it was Paleo.  Pedro Bastos gave an excellent lecture at the AHS on Dairy, Hormones & Human Health, which was quite an eye opener for me.

When I got back, I started the Whole30 which meant excluding dairy for 30 days.  I used to drink lots of tea everyday, with milk (I am English after all) – but luckily I got over this in America, as tea just didn’t seem to be as common place over there.  I also used to have a fair amount of yoghurt and cheese, which I also gave up.  I expected to be counting down the days when I could resume my dairy habit, but it just didn’t happen.

Since August I haven’t had any milk, but I have had cheese a couple of times and yoghurt once.  And the strangest thing?  I just don’t miss it at all.  I now enjoy drinking lots of different types of tea without milk, or hot water with a slice of lime.  I’m not really sure how I’d include milk again now!  I do like the taste of cheese and yoghurt, but I just don’t feel the need to include them in my diet.  Since I’ve gone stricter Paleo, I’ve been feeling fantastic.  My skin, sleep, mood, focus and general well being– everything has improved.  I should probably reintroduce dairy to identify exactly the effect it has on me – but given that I don’t miss it, I’d rather just continue to avoid it.

Is milk paleo dairy primal lacto cheese-min

I’m often asked how I can possibly get enough calcium without dairy.  I eat a good amount of dark green leafy vegetables, which are a great source of calcium.  From what I have read calcium balance is far more important than calcium intake.  When eating a diet high in acid-producing foods, such as the standard western diet, the kidney balances the acid load using the alkaline calcium salts from the bones.  As I don’t eat any processed food or grains and have a good balance of alkaline and acid foods in my diet, I have a good calcium balance – and therefore a lower calcium intake is not a problem.

Taking an evolutionary standpoint, obviously milk would not have been drunk until relatively recently, as ruminants weren’t domesticated, so certainly wouldn’t have been milked.  The purpose of milk is to nourish the offspring of the mother and enable it to grow – when you consider we are the only animal to eat another animals milk, it does seem a little odd?

One of the main arguments against dairy is IGF-1 (insulin like growth factor 1).  IGF-1 is increased by the cow’s growth hormones, which cause the cow to produce more milk.  IGF-1 is believed to promote cancer by increasing cell division and multiplying of cancer cells.  Commercial dairy cows are kept in gestation (by being artificially inseminated) almost constantly to ensure they produce milk.  They are milked ten out of 12 months – whereas a more natural milking pattern would involve only milking during early pregnancy.  It’s obviously in the interests of the dairy producers to do this, as they want to produce as much milk as possible.  The further into the pregnancy the more growth hormones are contained in the milk (as clearly the purpose of the milk is to support a growing calf).

For me, the jury is still out.  However, if I do decide to consume dairy again, I’ll go out of my way to find raw milk – I don’t think I could ever be happy with any commercial, pasteurised milk as I feel far to removed from the process and will never really know what is in it – and the condition of the cow(s) it came from.

What do you think about dairy?  Do you feel better of worse including dairy in your diet, or leaving it out?  I’d love to hear your views!

My daily commute barefoot paleo network sydney harbour bridge walking running-min

My Daily Commute

When Mark’s Daily Apple launched this video competition, it seemed like the perfect excuse to learn some new Mac skills, after buying my first ever MacBook Pro a couple of weeks ago.  I’d been thinking about making a video of my commute into work, as the sun rises behind the Sydney Opera house, whilst I run/ walk over the Harbour Bridge.  Perhaps with a cruise liner going under the bridge, at the exact same time I ran over it.  Yeah, didn’t happen like that.  By the time I found my camera I completely missed the sunrise and the weather was terrible.

So, let me know what you think of my first ever video!

I think walking is one of the best forms of exercise there is.  For me, walking to work is perfect.  There are no excuses or putting it off – I have to get to work, I have to walk!  My commute is 4.6km (2.9 miles), each way, so door to desk, via shower, it is well under an hour.  I’m increasing the amount I wear my Vibrams each week too, I’m almost up to every day.  If I were to get the bus, by the time I’ve waited around for a bus, it wouldn’t be that much quicker – not to mention the unpleasantness of buses at rush hour.  On the way into work it’s mainly downhill and I often run.  I’ve got particularly bad at needing to overtake EVERYONE in front of me.  I used to walk most of the way home, but since I’ve upped the fat in my diet, and decreased the carbs, I often have so much energy I feel compelled to run.  Even after a long day at work.  Crazy!

Another huge benefit I see in walking, particularly in the summer, is that I get a lot of sun exposure – but not the intense midday sun.  Great for keeping my Vitamin D levels topped up.  I also really enjoy the time to just be mindful and enjoy the fresh air and scenery, or listen to music and podcasts.  I wouldn’t swap this part of my day for anything!

Before I moved to Australia, my commute used to be 19 miles, in a car, on a motorway in the UK.  It doesn’t get much less Primal than that!

In addition to walking, I also do high intensity intensity training two or three times a week, with my fantastic PT, Karl.  In the year since I started these sessions, my strength and fitness have improved significantly.  I’m making slow, but steady progress in my push-up and chin-up ambitions!  I will master the unassisted chin-up, I will!

What does your fitness look like?  Do you walk to work too?

My daily commute barefoot paleo network sydney harbour bridge walking running-min

PrimalCon

7,497 Miles to PrimalCon

One of the highlights of 2011 so far was the weekend I went to PrimalCon 2011 in California in April.  I enjoyed it so much, that I booked my ticket for the 2012 event as soon as the tickets went on sale this morning.

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Sunset at PrimalCon

I hadn’t realised quite how far America was from Australia when I booked this year.  I went at quite short notice and used my air miles, so didn’t pay too much attention to minor details like flight times.  I was trying to minimise time off work, so I left Australia on the Friday and flew back on the Sunday night.  This was a big mistake!  I now know very well that Los Angeles is a very long 14 hour 7,497 mile flight from Sydney.  To make matters worse, as I used my air miles, I was assigned a very impressive route of Sydney to Brisbane, a night in Brisbane, a flight from Brisbane to Melbourne, then finally I got on my international flight at Melbourne!

It was all for the best however, as I met a wonderful new friend on the flight to LA, who was also attending PrimalCon (with just two people going from Australia, what were the chances of us being on the same flight?)

I’m planning to make PrimalCon 2012 into a much more sensible length America trip, especially as it falls the weekend after Easter.

I made some lifelong Primal friends in April, in fact, I spent a wonderful week in Texas with two of my PrimalCon friends, and met up with some others at the AHS in August.  I’m really looking forward to catching up with them and making some more Primal friends.

Over the whole weekend, the food was incredible.  So much was local Californian produce and it was great to have things like Kale and Turkey, which I find so difficult to find here in Australia (if you know of any good sources here, please let me know in the comments!)

One of my highlights from the weekend was the running workshop with Barefoot Ted.   I learnt so much from him and my running style has changed forever.  In fact, it was his workshop that inspired me to buy my Vibrams!  I’m thrilled to see Barefoot Ted is back again for next year’s event – hopefully I can refine my technique further still.
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Erwan Le Corre is a new presenter for the 2012 event.  I really enjoyed his talk and demonstration on MovNat at the AHS this year, and to have the opportunity to have a small group workshop with the guy who does this is incredibly exciting!

I just received my latest Amazon book order of Exuberant Animal by Frank Forencich yesterday – so couldn’t believe it when I read Frank Forencich is also a presenter at PrimalCon!  I’d better get started on his book…

Hopefully we’ll be able to get Mark Sisson over to Australia/ New Zealand in the near future, but in the meantime…  anyone else coming to PrimalCon with me?