Antioxidants & The Paleo Diet-min

Antioxidants & The Paleo Diet

Antioxidants are essential substances in the body, as they are known to protect cells from damage caused by chemicals, pollution and radiation. Some of the known antioxidants are Vitamin A, C and D as well as lycopene and selenium. It is important to have a diet which is rich in these antioxidants as it can really improve our health as well as our appearance. The kinds of foods which are high in antioxidants include vegetables, fruit, fish and nuts. These contain different types of antioxidants and offer many other benefits to the body.

As the Paleo diet contains foods which are highly rich in antioxidants, it is a good diet to follow in order to feel and look at our healthiest. We are eating as much as four times less of the amount of antioxidants our ancestors consumed, which is why our nation is becoming increasingly unhealthy and overweight. There are many people who eat other foods such as cereals, instead of fruits and vegetables and although they may be low in fat, they do not contain the amount of antioxidants we require to maintain a healthy diet.

There are a number of benefits to eating a diet which is full of antioxidants, including giving us a clearer complexion, helping us to maintain a healthy weight and reducing our likelihood of suffering from serious illnesses such as cancer and diabetes. It is therefore hugely important to analyse our diets to ensure we are eating all of the right foods.

The key is not only to eat a diet which is rich in antioxidants but also to ensure there is the right balance of antioxidants and that you are consuming a wide range of these so you are enjoying the full health benefits they can offer. There are a large number of antioxidants to be found in fruit and vegetables, whereas fish and meat have less but are still packed with other kinds of goodness. It is vitally important when following the Paleo diet to get the mix right so you are consuming as many different antioxidants as possible, as they all have different health benefits. The wider the range of antioxidants, the stronger the barrier is to any nasty pollution to our bodies, which can be hugely detrimental.

Antioxidants & The Paleo Diet-min

The great thing about foods which are rich in antioxidants is that they are also beneficial in other ways and are very low in fat so you can lose lots of weight while becoming as healthy as possible. A good way of ensuring you consume a high amount of vegetables and fruit is to use a juicer to mix them up as this will help you get the variety and is a much easier way to digest them. It means you are getting the whole goodness of the fruits and vegetables as you are eating every part of them, rather than discarding of parts of them.

If you like to enjoy the odd snack, nuts and seeds are a good way to ensure you are eating a lot of antioxidants, rather than eating sugary snacks and crisps, which have the opposite effect. In addition to consuming foods which are rich in antioxidants, there are also supplements which can be taken to boost the amount of these being digested in the body. It is more important to get the antioxidants from our foods, but there may be days when this isn’t possible, so supplements are a good alternative at these times.

There are foods which may claim to contain antioxidants but the best way to ensure you are getting it right is to follow the Paleo diet, as these foods have been well researched to show their health benefits. If you follow a plan such as eggs for breakfast, chicken salad for lunch, salmon and vegetables for dinner and nuts or seeds for your snacks, you will soon notice a difference in your appearance, how you feel and the amount of weight you lose.

Where do you get most of your antioxidants from?

7 signs intolerant dairy lactose casein lactase allergic symptoms milk Paleo Network-min

7 signs you’re dairy intolerant

Dairy is a huge dividing issue in the paleo world. Strict paleo would omit dairy, but a lot of people take a more primal approach and include good quality dairy in their diet. My study showed most people who identify with paleo do in fact consume some dairy. The deciding factor here is if you are dairy intolerant or not. And how would you know?

7 signs intolerant dairy lactose casein lactase allergic symptoms milk Paleo Network-min

Whilst not scientific, there are a few warning signs that will give you a pretty big clue you don’t tolerate dairy well. But what is it in the dairy that may not agree with you? Well, it’s not as simple as saying it’s the dairy, you could well have a reaction to the lactose, or the casein contained in dairy.

Today, I’m going to look at a Lactose Intolerance specifically, as this is the dairy component that seems to be most troublesome for so many people. Whilst Northern Europeans seem to tolerate lactose fairly well due to a long, long history of doing so, in other populations most people are lactose intolerant.

What does lactose intolerance mean?

Simply, this occurs when you stop making the enzyme lactase, which is required to digest lactose. Without lactase, bacteria will metabolise the lactose instead. Whilst not a serious condition, it is going to be uncomfortable and frustrating for the unwitting dairy consumer.

So what are the symptoms?

1. Symptoms are going to centre around your digestive system, so look out for:

2. Bloating

3. Gas…. Say no more

4. Crams and pains in your abdomen

5. How to put this nicely… loose bowel movements, sometimes very loose

6. Strange noises coming from your digestive system

7. In severe cases vomiting

8. Unexplained tiredness

Important to note is how soon they symptoms came on after consuming the dairy? And what type of dairy was it?

What next?

If you suspect you may be intolerant to dairy, you need to find out.

The best way to test this is by an elimination diet. No dairy whatsoever for 30 days. See how you feel, are the symptoms still there? If you’ve been symptom free, you can test this further by gradually introducing back in certain dairy products. I’ve heard some people will be fine with hard cheeses for example, but not soft cheese. Whatever you introduce, make sure it’s in isolation, and wait at least three days before bringing another dairy variable into the mix. You can experiment with raw dairy, fermented dairy, perhaps you’ll find clarified butter; ghee has a different impact on you.

Do you suspect you’re dairy intolerant? Do you consume it?

7 Ways to Make Your Desk Job Healthier office work cubicle paleo diet-min

7 Ways to Make Your Desk Job Healthier

In an ideal world, none of us would have jobs in offices or at desks, and we’d all have the day free to roam the land, walking miles to hunt for tonight’s dinner or digging in the vegetable garden. Sadly, real life isn’t that simple – and many of us rely on the jobs we have to provide ourselves with good quality, healthy foods to put on the table of an evening.

We know the health impacts long periods of sitting at a desk can bring about, so here are seven things you can do to make this kind of work healthier.

1.       Take a movement break every hour

If your job forces you to sit still for most of the day, it’s important you take the time to move as often as you can. Try and schedule a five minute ‘movement break’ every hour, where you go for a walk and stretch. This will help to counteract the negative impact on your posture and muscle alignment of long periods of sitting down.

7 Ways to Make Your Desk Job Healthier office work cubicle paleo diet-min

2.       Walk to work

If you’re lucky enough to live within a reasonable distance to your workplace, why not walk (or even better, run) there once or twice a week?

3.       Take the stairs

Simple things like taking the stairs instead of the lift can make a real difference, especially if your office is located on a high floor. If you can, why not incorporate some stair sprints into your breaks?

4.       Take lunch outside

Whenever the weather allows, take yourself outside for some fresh air in your lunch break. It will give you a much needed break from technology and artificial light, as well as give you a real boost of vitamin D.

5.       Get a light filter

If you’re concerned about the levels of blue light you’re taking in by staring at a computer, why not try a blue light filter for your screen?

6.       Stand up / treadmill desks

Your boss may take some convincing on this one, but why not recommend standing / treadmill desks for the workplace?

7.       Grounding mats

Grounding, or earthing, mats are brilliant if you want to get more connected with the earth. They slip under your desk easily – read more about them here

There we have it – seven simple ways to make your desk job much healthier. Have I missed anything? If you work in an office, what steps do you take to make it a healthier environment?

What's so special about grass fed beef paleo primal health benefits-min

What’s so special about grass fed beef?

Grass fed beef gets plenty of recognition on the Paleo diet, and rightly so. We know our ancestors would have undoubtedly eaten copious amounts of wild fed ruminants; not the sort that were shuttled in their droves into giant feed-lots, devoid of natural light and space to roam, and fed with industrialised slop made from genetically modified corn, barley and soya. But, ideology aside, what is it that actually makes grass fed beef superior to ‘modern’ grain fed beef? Is it worth paying extra for – sometimes double the price? In a short answer, yes. And here’s why…

What's so special about grass fed beef paleo primal health benefits-min

As the demand for beef (and meat in general) rose significantly throughout the 20th century, ‘farmers’ began to reassess their production methods with one goal in mind. Profit. These beef barons were prepared to stop at nothing to decrease the production costs of each cow, with no concern for the animals’ welfare or for the welfare of the people eating the meat; and thus, factory farming was born. There were, of course, many who still wanted to do things the right way, and a divide became apparent. As factory farming has developed throughout the years, and cheaper, nutrient void food has become more available, this divide has become significantly greater.

One reason we eschew grains on the Paleo diet (apart from lectins, gluten and phytic acid), is the distinct lack of nutrient density that they offer in comparison with whole foods. If you genetically modify these grains, the nutrient density becomes even lower; practically non-existent. When cattle are fed a diet that is so devoid of nutrients, the meat they offer is therefore much less nutritious than that of an animal fed on a natural diet. This shows in the nutritional profiles of grass fed vs grain fed meat; grass fed is significantly higher in vitamins (in particular B vitamins, vitamin E, vitamin K and vitamin B12), minerals (including magnesium, selenium, zinc and calcium), CLA and Omega 3. We’ll come on to that last one again shortly. The lifespan of the cows also plays a part in the nutrients they offer; as factory farmed cattle have a much shorter lifespan (as they are overfed and under-exercised so that they reach the slaughter house in double quick time), they do not have time to build up the nutritional profile that they should do naturally. Quite simply, unhealthy diet + overeating + lack of exercise = nutritionally depleted beef. The same formula would also mean a nutritionally depleted human as well, which isn’t really much of a shock.

We’ve spoke about omega 3 and omega 6 before, and how it is important to maintain as close to an even ratio as possible to reduce inflammation in the body. Thanks to their diet, grass fed beef is significantly higher in omega 3 than its grain fed counterpart. On average, grass fed beef has a ratio of around 2.5/1 (omega 6:omega 3). Depending on the grasses they graze on, it can be as low as 1:1. The ratio of grain fed beef, on the other hand, can exceed 20:1.

To decrease the production time, factory farmed cows are fed artificial hormones to fatten them up more quickly. The presence of these hormones have been linked to hormone irregularities in the humans who eat a lot of grain fed beef – which is another reason to source your meat carefully.

To summarise, grass fed beef is better for you, better for the environment, better for the economy, and better for the animals themselves. It’s the way that beef should be eaten, but sadly, it is expensive. If you are limited in how much grass fed beef you can buy for financial reasons, opt for leaner cuts of meat when you buy grain fed. There will be less of an omega 3:6 imbalance as the all-round fat content is lower. Toxins are also stored in the fatty deposits of the animals, so by choosing leaner cuts you’ll minimise the toxins that you consume. If you’re completely against buying grain fed, look for cheaper cuts of meat like shin and chuck roast, and cook them slowly. Offal is a great bet too.

Do you eat grass fed (or pastured) meat? Is it important to you?

Paleo asthma switch on allergies anaphylaxis hives allergic reactions salycilates

Does Asthma switch on allergies?

A year or so after developing asthma out of the blue, something strange started to happen to my skin.

At completely random intervals, I started to notice my skin would be covered in small red hives. I changed washing powder, re-washed everything and it made no difference. I wondered if it was what I was eating, so I made myself eat lots of healthy raw veggies. I loved tomatoes, so they tended to be the main thing I’d eat more of to get rid of these bizarre hives. But oddly, they’d get worse. The hives got bigger and bigger and I was completely covered, head to toe in huge angry red hives.

I remember one day I had a terrible hangover, and as well as the headache, woke up with the worse hives I’d ever had competing for space on my skin. I’d drunk wine plenty of times before – what could possibly be causing this? The hives would gradually reduce and either disappear for a while, or suddenly and inexplicably get large and angry again.

Paleo asthma switch on allergies anaphylaxis hives allergic reactions salycilates

Around this time I had a bit of a headache and reached for some ibuprofen. I hadn’t taken it for a while, but it had always been really effective. Pretty much straight after my eyes got really really itchy. I looked in the mirror to see my eyelids had swollen up – I looked like I’d been in a fight! I went to an out of hours medical centre and was given anti-histamine, and it didn’t take long for the swelling to go down. I was told that I must avoid Non-Steroid Anti Inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s) such as aspirin and ibuprofen and that the reaction is likely to get worse with each anaphylactic incident. Great.

It was easy to avoid aspirin and ibuprofen, but the hives kept randomly appearing, so I was referred to an allergy specialist. It was quickly confirmed that Salicylates were causing the hives. I was shown two lists of food, one contained ALL of my favourite foods like tomatoes, cucumbers, capsicum, zucchini and watercress. I estimated about 80% of my diet was on the first list she showed me. The second list, wasn’t food I especially cared for. As you can probably guess, the first list was food high in salicylates. The doctor explained salicylate tolerance as being like a bucket. You can have these foods, but one your tolerance bucket is full, you’ll have a reaction. Keep the bucket low and you can enjoy them in moderation. I now rarely eat these foods and thankfully haven’t had any serious hive episodes since. When I notice red marks starting to appear on my skin, I’m really careful to completely avoid foods even containing moderate levels of salicylates, and I find my skin clears up.

Fortunately with the anaphylaxis, it’s easy to avoid and I’ve only had one (all be it very serious) anaphylactic incident since – an experience I don’t intend to repeat.

I’ve read a lot about asthma and allergies happening at the same time (for example an allergic reaction causing asthma symptoms), but anecdotally I think once you become susceptible to asthma, you turn on the switch to allergy susceptibility. I’d love to hear your experience of asthma and allergies. Do you have asthma and allergies? Did they both start happening at a similar time in your life?

Did my address where I lived cause my asthma paleo

Did my address give me asthma?

Long before I moved to Australia, I lived in an idyllic rural village in the South West of England, with open views of fields for miles around in each direction. The houses were beautiful cottages made of Cotswold stone, with roses in the gardens – and looked exactly as they would have a hundred years before. The local teenagers hung out by the park on horse-back, and the two big houses hosted annual Summer Supper parties exactly as they had for generations. My elderly neighbour lived in the cottage his mother had been born in.

The village had a quaint old pub, a church, a nursery school, a post box and a play park. On the corner was a farm you could let yourself into, leave a couple of pounds in the honesty box, and help yourself to freshly laid eggs. The nearest shop was about six miles away, which was the closest option for even a pint of milk or load of bread (this was long before I’d ever even heard the word paleo). With miles of public rights of way, it was right in the middle of nature. And unfortunately a great big motorway.

Did my address where I lived cause my asthma paleo

The huge motorway was the main route from London to Wales and dissected the village in two. In the time I lived there, there was only one brief occasion when the constant rumbling of cars and heavy goods vehicles stopped – just for an hour or so. On this one afternoon, the entire motorway was closed after a serious accident. Rather than being blissful, the silence was eerie. Day in, day out, no matter how ungodly the hour, the roar of the motorway never ended. Along with the noise, the motorway covered the windows and walls of my should-have-been-yellow house, with a thick layer of dirt.

On hot days (rare in the UK), the better option was to be uncomfortably hot, rather than sleep with the windows open.

The fields that surrounded the village grew all sorts of different produce and it was fascinating to see a fallow field transform to a field of wheat in a matter of weeks – all from my kitchen window. Every so often I’d see the farm machinery spraying the fields, which would fill the air with a heavy, unpleasant smell for a couple of days. The type of smell you can taste, long before you get close to it.

Half way down of one of the bridal paths, right next to the stream, was a huge steaming pile of (what I eventually learnt to be) human manure. I saw some of the best tomato plants I’ve ever seen growing up from that pile. The smell was one of the most unpleasant I’ve ever encountered, as made clear by my Labrador on her twice daily walks, who would do everything she could to drag me closer so she could have a good roll around in it (fortunately I was onto her and she never got to indulge in her penchant for excrement). Just when the pile looked like it couldn’t get any bigger, it would all but disappear, and I’d notice the smell had moved to the nearby fields, full of produce.

After living this healthy rural lifestyle for a year or two, I had a cold that just never went away. Or rather the cough never went away. No matter how much I’d cough, it would never quite resolve the need for the coughing. Eventually I went to the local-ish doctor (across the motorway, in the neighbouring village) expecting to be given some medication to clear up my cough. Without even getting so far as to see the doctor, a nurse heard my wheezing and coughing and instantly diagnosed asthma. Which I hadn’t realised you could develop, totally out of the blue, at the ripe old age of 23.

With the help of modern medicine, the coughing stopped, and it was manageable*

But I’ve always wondered, did where I live cause me to develop asthma?

If you developed asthma as an adult, what do you think caused it? I’d love to hear, in the comments below.


 

* Several years later (long after I’d left the village) my asthma was instantly cured as a side effect of life-saving treatment I received in a completely unrelated incident.

Is bacon really bad unhealthy nitrates processed paleo

Is bacon really so bad?

Whenever I even mention the b word I get called out. Yep, apparently bacon is highly processed and must be avoided at all costs.

But is it really bad?

Almost everything we eat is processed in one way or another. We buy our meat cut, or maybe ground. We buy our meat dried or frozen. When I think of processed meat, I think of meat that has been ground up, combined with chemicals and other dubious ingredients and given a completely new form and shape (think “chicken” nuggets and hot dogs). Bacon is not processed like this.

Bacon bad for you nitrates sodium cured processed pork belly preserved Paleo Network

Why is bacon so different?

Bacon has been around for a long time, from the days we needed to preserve our meat to enable us to keep it for longer without it going bad. I don’t think the fact it’s preserved is the issue – the issue is how it’s preserved – and there are a lot of differences here.

Traditionally, bacon would have been preserved using salt, but since we’ve all got so worried about the wrong things being unhealthy, we now avoid sodium like the plague – so many modern techniques use ingredients that are a long way from natural, to preserve the meat.

If you’ve looked at the ingredients on packs on bacon, you’ll have seen huge differences. Looking at my local store, they offer bacon with contents between 83% and 95% pork – clearly the lower pork content bacon is to be given a wide berth.

But what about the other ingredients in packages bacon? Here are the ingredients I found, in various quantities:

  • Water,
  • Salt,
  • Dextrose (Corn), Dextrose (Maize),
  • Hydrolysed Vegetable Protein (Maize)
  • Sucrose, Sugar (yes – they add SUGAR to bacon!)
  • Mineral Salts (450, 451, 452),
  • Antioxidant (316),
  • Sodium Nitrite (250).
  • Food Acid (325)

But did you know you can get bacon uncured, without any of this? If you have a butcher like mine, you’ll be able to get pasture raised uncured bacon, without any of these additional ingredients.

What about nitrates?

Nitrates are a big talking point when it comes to bacon. Well, even unprocessed bacon contains nitrates naturally, and believe it or not celery is high in nitrates – and we don’t see warnings on sticks of celery. For more information on why dietary nitrates aren’t a bad thing – check out these studies: Inorganic Nitrate Suplementation Lowers Blood Pressure in Humans: Role for Nitrite-Derived NO Hypertension, 2010, 56, 274-271 and Dietary Inorganic Nitrate Improves Mitochondrial Efficiency in Humans.Cell Metabolism, 2011, 13, 149-159.

As for the sodium, when you eat a natural paleo diet – it’s often actually a good thing to get more sodium into your diet.

And the fat content?

Of course, a huge argument against bacon is the saturated fat content. Yes, bacon is a lot higher in fat than turkey. But I don’t need to tell you why eating fat is not a problem, do I?

What do you think about bacon? Do you eat it often? Where do you get yours?

10 Reasons Meditate Meditation Mindfullness buddhism Primal Paleo Network

10 Reasons You Should Try Meditation

Have you ever tried meditating? Perhaps you’ve dismissed it as being a bit too hippy and new age? Or wouldn’t know where to start?

Well I’m here to convince you why you should give it a go!

10 Reasons Meditate Meditation Mindfullness buddhism Primal Paleo Network

What is meditation?

I really like this description by Jon Kabat-Zinn:

[meditation is] paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally, to the unfolding of experience moment to moment

Why should you do it?

  1. Meditation has been shown to physically change your brain, just 27 minutes a day has been shown to increase grey matter after just six weeks.
  2. Meditation reduces inflammation
  3. Immune function is increased with regular practice
  4. Pain decreases
  5. It increases happiness whilst lowering depression, stress and anxiety
  6. It enhances compassion and emotional intelligence
  7. It allows you to control your emotions far better
  8. Your focus and attention span will increase with Meditation practice
  9. Your memory will also improve
  10. If you have any type of sleep issues, there is a lot of evidence suggesting a mediation practice could make a substantial difference

But how?

It’s definitely not easy, but you can start right now. The more time you spend practicing, the better you’ll get at it, and the more you’ll benefit. You don’t need anything to start, nor do you have to sit in a funny position or chant or spend the whole day doing it. Even if you only have ten minute spare, that will be a perfect place to start.
There is an old Zen saying:

“You should sit in meditation for 20 minutes a day, unless you are too busy, then you should sit for an hour.”

I find the best way to start is to sit somewhere quiet, where you won’t be interrupted. You want it to be light and airy – the aim here is not to fall asleep. I repeat: You do not want to fall asleep! Sit comfortable and focus on your breath. As you breathe in, notice the sensation of the air entering your nose. Notice the breath as you pause before you exhale. As you exhale, again, notice the sensation of the warm air leaving your body.

Thoughts will keep entering your mind, but the trick is to not chase these thoughts. Let them enter your mind and let them exit, without taking part. I like to think of it like a blue sky with lots of balloons. As a balloon (a thought) comes into your vision (awareness), instead of taking hold of the string, just watch it float away. If a thought pops in your head about what you’re going to make for dinner tonight, don’t engage with it and start thinking about what ingredients you have in the fridge. Just acknowledge the thought as if you’re just an observer

You know sometimes when your phone or computer start acting up and you have to restart? This is how I think of meditation. It’s giving your brain a break from the constant chasing of thoughts. But it’s also very different to sleep. When did you last give your mind a break?

If you’re new to meditation, it’s so much easier to get started with guided meditations instead of trying on your own for the first time. I go to classes, but there are so many great mp3’s and free youtube meditations that will help.

I’d love to hear your meditation experiences and tips

4 things you must do after a course of antibiotics

4 things you must do after a course of antibiotics

Antibiotics are a touchy subject. There is a lot of overuse (you hear all the time about doctors prescribing them straight away, without even being sure what the issue is) and resistance is becoming a real problem.

4 things you must do after a course of antibiotics

Whilst I’d love to say I’d never take them, there are certain situations where antibiotics truly are a modern miracle. In fact, I took them not so long ago when I found out I was host to an unwelcome parasite. The problem with antibiotics, is that as well as killing off the infection, they also kill off all of the good bacteria in our gut.

With diminished good bacterial colonies in the gut, this can significantly reduce your immune system and mess with your hormone balance. But it doesn’t have to be permanent. Here are some steps you can take to help your gut to repair as soon as you’ve finished the course of antibiotics.

1. Eat strict paleo

So perhaps you’re clean eating had lapsed slightly before your antibiotics – but now is the time to get back on the wagon. Ditch anything processed and eat real, whole foods, keeping sugar (from natural sources) and carbohydrates low whilst you’re healing.

2. Eat fermented foods everyday

Have some kombucha, sauerkraut, yoghurt or kimchi ready to go. Fermented foods will help to re-introduce probiotics to your gut – so make sure to mix up your fermented foods and eat them regularly. You can also look at probiotic supplements.

3. You’ve taken care of probiotics – don’t forget prebiotics

Soluble fibre such as that provided from root vegetables and peeled fruit is a great way to feed the good bacteria you need to re-establish.

4. Eat bone broth

Said to be able to resurrect the dead, bone broth is the ideal nourishment after your course of antibiotics. It will help support your liver and digestive system –so make sure you have a big batch ready to go.

What’s your approach to antibiotics? Have you taken many courses?

 

 

7 signs deficient vitamin d sunshine paleo network

7 Signs You’re Deficient in Vitamin D

Do you get enough Vitamin D? Luckily we seem to be coming out of the sun-fearing era slightly, but even so, with so many of us in office jobs, it can be really hard to get enough vitamin D.

Vitamin D Deficiency 7 Signs Symptoms Sun Exposure Paleo Network

Whilst some foods are fortified with vitamin D, they aren’t natural whole foods-and even so, the amount they provide is tiny compared to the levels you can get naturally, from the sun.

There’s no substitute for getting regular blood tests to find out exactly where your vitamin D levels are sitting, but did you know certain symptoms may indicate a deficiency?

How’s your mood?

Sunlight boosts serotonin levels, which are associated with our mood. If you’re feeling inexplicably blue, vitamin D is definitely worth investigating.

You have darker skin

The darker your skin, the more sun exposure you’ll need to get sufficient vitamin D levels.  This means if you have darker skin and live further from the equator – or spend a lot of time indoors, you’re more likely to be deficient

You’re in pain

If you have bone or muscle pain, this could also point to low vitamin D levels. In fact, most muscle weakness appears to be linked to low levels of vitamin D.

You’re tired

If you’re generally feeling fatigued, this could be because you don’t have enough of the vitamin D required for its role in energy production.

Respiratory issues

Another potential symptom is chronic respiratory problems such as asthma – it’s been observed that higher vitamin D levels can decrease the severity of asthma attacks.

You’re overweight

Being overweight means you need move vitamin D in your system, since its fat soluble – whilst decreased levels also make it harder to lose weight.

You get every infection and bug going around

Vitamin D plays an important role in your immune system – so if you’re catching one thing after another, get those levels checked!

When did you last get your levels checked? Were you deficient?