16 Reasons You Should Eat More Bone Broth!

by Suz on June 6, 2013 · 2 comments

in Cooking, Food, Health

Bone broth (or stock), put simply, is made by boiling up animal bones. You can add in some veggies and herbs – but the most important thing is that the bones are from healthy animals (or fish) that were raised organically, humanely on a pasture, or in the wild; i.e. from grass fed cattle, pastured poultry or wild caught fish. Using some apple cider vinegar when making the broth helps draw the mineral s and nutrients from the bones – and make sure you break of crack the bones, to ensure you can access all of the nutrients and minerals contained in the marrow inside.

Whilst you can buy it, you definitely want to make your own to be sure it’s from good quality animals – without any nasty added extras. You can try beef, bison, fish, chicken, lamb or even venison broth.Paleo Diet Recipe Primal Bone Broth 16 Reasons Stock Chicken Beef

1. It is really cheap to make (your butcher or local farmer may even give you bones for free – or save the bones from your own cooking)

2. If you’re sick with no appetite, bone broth is easy to drink and will replenish much needed nutrients in your body – whilst the gelatin content will help to neutralise a virus.

3. Bone broth is high in a very usable form of calcium, magnesium, silicon, sulphur and phosphorous – not to mention lots of other trace nutrients

4. Broth is a great way to use up parts of the animal you wouldn’t know what to do with – try adding in heads, feet, necks and skin!

5. Broth is a great base for many meals such as soups, stews – and a delicious homemade gravy

6. It virtually cooks itself – leave it in your slow cooker and come home to an almost ready bone broth

7. The high collagen content is great for your joints, hair, skin and nails.

8. It is even cheaper to make if you use bones of less expensive meat such as lamb and goat

Bone Broth Recipe Book Chicken Beef Stock

9. The connective tissue in ligaments and joints are kept healthy thanks to the high concentration of the amino acids proline and glycine in bone broth.

10. You can make up a huge batch of broth and freeze it in individual portions – giving you a meal base on hand whenever you need it.

11. By encouraging smooth connective tissue, bone broth is said to be a natural cure for cellulite

12. Damaged gut lining is healed by the gelatin – which offers relief to gastrointestinal issues such as IBS, Crohn’s disease as well as constipation, diarrhea, food sensitivities and of course leaky gut.

13. The gelatin content helps aid digestion

14. The amino acid glycine (found in high concentrations in bone broth) is great to help detoxify the liver

15. Chondroitin Sulfate, found in bone broth, has not only be found to help with joint pain from osteoarthritis, it also helps to lower atherosclerosis.

16. It tastes good!

If you want to know even more about bone broth – and get lots of great recipes to make your own – check out Bone Broth: A Recipe For Health which is packed with recipes, information, tips and tricks.

How often do you make bone broth? I’d love to hear your tricks, tips and favourite recipes in the comments below.

The Paleo Recipe Book
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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Kristen December 4, 2013 at 2:05 am

I just ordered some Bison marrow bones from US Wellness (all chicken was out of stock), I’m determined to try it. But I can find a ton of recipes on how to make the broth, but not many tell you what you do with the actual broth. Chicken broth/stock seems obvious to go the chicken soup route. What would you suggest for Bison?

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